HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What does this mean for US manufacturers?
Rob Spiegel   7/18/2011 11:18:16 AM
NO RATINGS
That's an excellent point, Dave. Those who oppose RoHS on scientific grounds do indeed discuss its danger (or lack of) in the product's useful life and after disposal. You're correct about the "birth" part where there would be plenty of exposure.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: What does this mean for US manufacturers?
Dave Palmer   7/15/2011 1:12:20 PM
NO RATINGS
I thought the whole point of RoHS was that it considers the product from cradle to grave.  The fact that lead may not leach out of a soldered joint in a landfill doesn't mean that the use of leaded solders is environmentally benign.  In this case, the risks are at the cradle, rather than the grave.  The same goes for chromate conversion coatings.  I don't think a chromated die casting presents much of a threat to the environment - but a a chromate line obviously does.

In my field (marine engines), we still use a lot of RoHS restricted substances, including cadmium, hexavalent chromium, etc.  We are actively looking for good alternatives, and already have a few in place.  The U.S. Department of Defense has actually a lot of helpful work in this regard.

There has been a lot of confusion in the U.S. about exactly what RoHS is, what it applies to, etc.  I'm sure that these changes will only increase the confusion.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What does this mean for US manufacturers?
Rob Spiegel   7/12/2011 5:51:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Good points, sensor pro. One of the reasons IPC fought so hard to make sure RoHS changes were based on proven science going forward is because many in the electronics industry criticized the banning of lead in solder, insisting that the EU didn't base the decision on proven science. Many materials experts insist the lead in solder won't leach out in a landfill and they have challenged the EU to prove otherwise, to no avail.

The fact that IPC won on this point during the RoHS Recast is significant.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: What does this mean for US manufacturers?
sensor pro   7/12/2011 12:21:32 PM
NO RATINGS
This is the only positive news in this whole ROHS issue. We still produce for ourselves withoiut ROHS. I still see too mane peoduction issue which in my opinion dod not justify this ROHS mess. Just last week some connectors melted while in automatic assembly due to high temperature. They all were ROHS, however with a very borderline thermal chanracteristics. Now we need to look for an even more expensive part. We were producing this product to over 10 years without any problem. Now we have burnt connectors and overheated ICs. Also during rework, the ROHS solder smells terrible. I really fail to see any serious benefits. Am I the only one with negative views?

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What does this mean for US manufacturers?
Rob Spiegel   7/12/2011 8:42:45 AM
NO RATINGS
If your markets are only in the United States RoHS has no affect. There are medical equipment manufacturers and many defense manufacturers who are not affected by RoHS. Global manufacturers, however, have adopted the RoHS restrictions since they don't know which of the products might end up on the European market.

The biggest change in the RoHS Recast is that some portions of the electronics market are no longer exempt from RoHS restrictions. That includes medical electronics. So, if you're a medical electronics producer with a global market, the RoHS restrictions may be newly applicable.

So far, there is no credible movement in the United States to create a domestic RoHS.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
What does this mean for US manufacturers?
Beth Stackpole   7/12/2011 8:05:54 AM
NO RATINGS
Seems like we've been hearing a lot about new RoHS guidelines as of late--I believe Rob, you wrote something recently about new regulations in India. My question is what does all this mean for engineering and manufacturing groups in the States given that Europe is obviously a key market for them and will these new stronger rules finally pave the way for similar and subsequent regulations here?



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The engineers and inventors of the post WWII period turned their attention to advancements in electronics, communication, and entertainment. Breakthrough inventions range from LEGOs and computer gaming to the integrated circuit and Ethernet -- a range of advancements that have little in common except they changed our lives.
The age of touch could soon come to an end. From smartphones and smartwatches, to home devices, to in-car infotainment systems, touch is no longer the primary user interface. Technology market leaders are driving a migration from touch to voice as a user interface.
Soft starter technology has become a way to mitigate startup stressors by moderating a motor’s voltage supply during the machine start-up phase, slowly ramping it up and effectively adjusting the machine’s load behavior to protect mechanical components.
A new report from the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) makes a start on developing control schemes, process measurements, and modeling and simulation methods for powder bed fusion additive manufacturing.
If you’re developing a product with lots of sensors and no access to the power grid, then you’ll want to take note of a Design News Continuing Education Center class, “Designing Low Power Systems Using Battery and Energy Harvesting Energy Sources."
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
May 4 - 8, Designing Low Power Systems using Battery and Energy Harvesting Energy Sources
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service