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sgilden
User Rank
Iron
Life signs in your autombile & Personal info floating through your wireless connections!
sgilden   7/12/2011 4:50:29 PM
NO RATINGS
There's lots of health related data that one could collect while driving related to the driver's ability to control the vehicle and the status of everyone in range who happens to have a wireless/blue tooth adapter.  Whatever data is available could be transferred more effectively to a smart phone (and disseminated from there) than from the car – The cell phone could then talk to the car (as the phones “BIG” user interface) to warn the occupants, along with calling  one’s doctors family and emergency people listed in the phone as first responders.  Note that the cell phone/smart phone is a more general solution, and it is a lot less expensive than a car and more easily “carried” around with the user.

Driver alertness, pulse rate, blood pressure, and many other things may be more important than changes in glucose when detecting the fitness of the driver.  Drug conditions… electronic bracelet activities and other tings may also be of more importance…

Glucose monitor:   For continuous glucose monitoring one must have a meter that does not  interrupt or the distract the drivers concentration from driving!  this implies a meter that does not require a pin prick and manual dexterity to place a sample in a receptacle ect.

By the way, Alertness can effect glucose levels-- while fasting I personally watched my glucose drop 10 points per hour in my office (110, 100, 90) then drove home and found it back at up 110--presumably due to getting up from my desk and the increased concentration to pay attention to my driving.  note:  I am not I diabetic but I was testing glucose meters for Medisense...

On privacy ...  if the data is available on blue tooth or other wireless connection, it needs security.  Maybe you want to police or people in the next car, or first responders to know your condition.  However, maybe you don’t want everyone who can read your data stream to have access… and know your weaknesses ….

 

There's lots of health related data that one could collect while driving related to the driver's ability to control the vehicle and the status of everyone in range who happens to have a wireless/blue tooth adapter.  Whatever data is available could be transferred more effectively to a smart phone (and disseminated from there) than from the car – The cell phone could then talk to the car (as the phones “BIG” user interface) to warn the occupants, along with calling  one’s doctors family and emergency people listed in the phone as first responders.  Note that the cell phone/smart phone is a more general solution, and it is a lot less expensive than a car and more easily “carried” around with the user.

Driver alertness, pulse rate, blood pressure, and many other things may be more important than changes in glucose when detecting the fitness of the driver.  Drug conditions… electronic bracelet activities and other tings may also be of more importance…

Glucose monitor:   For continuous glucose monitoring one must have a meter that does not  interrupt or the distract the drivers concentration from driving!  this implies a meter that does not require a pin prick and manual dexterity to place a sample in a receptacle ect.

By the way, Alertness can effect glucose levels-- while fasting I personally watched my glucose drop 10 points per hour in my office (110, 100, 90) then drove home and found it back at up 110--presumably due to getting up from my desk and increased concentration to pay attention to driving.  note:  I am not I diabetic but I was testing glucose meters for Medisense...

On privacy ...  if the data is available on blue tooth or other wireless connection, it needs security.  Maybe you want to police or people in the next car, or first responders to know your condition.  However, maybe you don’t want everyone who can read your data stream to have access… and know your weaknesses ….

 xx

There's lots of health related data that one could collect while driving related to the driver's ability to control the vehicle and the status of everyone in range who happens to have a wireless/blue tooth adapter.  Whatever data is available could be transferred more effectively to a smart phone (and disseminated from there) than from the car – The cell phone could then talk to the car (as the phones “BIG” user interface) to warn the occupants, along with calling  one’s doctors family and emergency people listed in the phone as first responders.  Note that the cell phone/smart phone is a more general solution, and it is a lot less expensive than a car and more easily “carried” around with the user.

Driver alertness, pulse rate, blood pressure, and many other things may be more important than changes in glucose when detecting the fitness of the driver.  Drug conditions… electronic bracelet activities and other tings may also be of more importance…

Glucose monitor:   For continuous glucose monitoring one must have a meter that does not  interrupt or the distract the drivers concentration from driving!  this implies a meter that does not require a pin prick and manual dexterity to place a sample in a receptacle ect.

By the way, Alertness can effect glucose levels-- while fasting I personally watched my glucose drop 10 points per hour in my office (110, 100, 90) then drove home and found it back at up 110--presumably due to getting up from my desk and increased concentration to pay attention to driving.  note:  I am not I diabetic but I was testing glucose meters for Medisense...

On privacy ...  if the data is available on blue tooth or other wireless connection, it needs security.  Maybe you want to police or people in the next car, or first responders to know your condition.  However, maybe you don’t want everyone who can read your data stream to have access… and know your weaknesses ….



 

HJL798
User Rank
Iron
Re: What about the passenger?
HJL798   7/11/2011 2:22:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks David - you are 100% right, a simple text to a parental phone at predetermined nearing danger levels would be priceless especially during the school day. Let me know whne you have the app done! - Henry

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
Re: What about the passenger?
David McCollum   7/11/2011 1:25:16 PM
NO RATINGS
@HJL, I mised that idea, but it would be a great concept, not only for the car, but to pop up on your home network and to send a text message to a parental phone. They might have the kids in the back yard, at the park, or in the movie. I like this concept better and better. Now, if it were only available. I bet there will be an app for that before too long.

HJL798
User Rank
Iron
Re: What about the passenger?
HJL798   7/11/2011 11:28:16 AM
NO RATINGS
My daughter was diagnosed at 5, have friends with 2 year old diabetics.
Having the ability to see her numbers on screen while driving would be priceless.

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
Re: What about the passenger?
David McCollum   7/9/2011 12:22:34 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm still not sold on the idea of needing the system in my car. I AM a lot more interested in seeing such a system developed that kept diabetes or any other medication issue from being so consuming. As it stands now, I write write the time, glucose reading, oral medication, and insulin in my planner. Yes, I now that a paper planned certifies me as a dinosaur, but otherwise, if I become involved in a project, a video production runs into overtime, or I simply sit down and become engrossed in a novel. . .I might forget my pill or eat at 7 instead of 5:30. An automatic system that can monitor glucose levels and adjust infusion accordingly would be such a relief. It could also work with seizure medications, blood pressure alerts, and various other medical events. The fact that it could interface with the car via bluetooth is merely a convenience. If the system did that, it could also pop up a display on my computer screen or use my cell to notify someone that I had passed out and give a location ia the GPS capability. There in lies the value of such a system. I don't see it switching Chevy drivers to Ford. (My little Monza took care of that for me.)

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What about the passenger?
Charles Murray   7/8/2011 6:58:57 PM
NO RATINGS
Jack: The point is that it isn't a lot of trouble for Ford to integrate into the vehicle. Ford isn't using the old model -- whereby they do all the design work. I don't want to minimize what Ford engineers did, but it's not a huge task for them. The cost benefit ratio is in Ford's favor, especially if a million customers, such as David, decide they want to buy a Ford as a result. 

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
Yes. . . but
David McCollum   7/8/2011 11:27:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Good points, but I have to consider that whether or not this technology ends up in the automotobile control system, the development of that technology is significant to those of us who are diabetic. Even without shwingthe information on the car;s dashboard, how wonderful it would be if we had aa device that could sense our glucose levels and adjust the automatic infusion of insulin accordingly. As it is now. we eat, we guess how many units we need, we hope we are right, and if someone put too much sugar into something, these cauculations are rendered useless, This requires retesting, re-medicating, and. .. it is endless. I have to say I don't need it in my car, but I'd l;ove to have it in my life.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: What about the passenger?
Jack Rupert, PE   7/7/2011 5:03:33 PM
NO RATINGS
Lauren & Charles, I understand what you're saying, but I still fail to see the point of car integration. If a person (passenger or drive) has a medical condition that requires constant monitoring, it would need to be connected with the ability to alarm at all times - such as wherever they are traveling to. A DVD player (for instance) is only needed to provide entertainment on the road.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What about the passenger?
Charles Murray   7/7/2011 11:13:43 AM
NO RATINGS
You're exactly right, Lauren. If a child in the backseat -- or anyone in the vehicle -- has unsafe blood sugar levels, the glucose monitor can alert the driver though Ford Sync.

Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
What about the passenger?
Lauren Muskett   7/7/2011 10:55:26 AM
NO RATINGS
Everyone is focused on the driver being distracted by having this monitoring system, but maybe this is something that could expand to help the passenger. If the passenger needs constant glucose monitoring and the car alerts the driver, the driver could safely pull over and help or take them to a nearby hospital. I like all the new infotainment going into cars and think most of the applications are geared on driving safer.

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