HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Page 1/2  >  >>
ckit1477
User Rank
Iron
Re: Saturn Goo Experiences?
ckit1477   5/5/2012 5:28:56 AM
NO RATINGS
i just painted my auto body panels with Dupli Color paint for cars and trucks i sanded the crap out of the panels before painting and after a couple coats i sanded again with 1500 grit wet&dry paper put a couple more coats on and let dry for a couple days before and after.

David12345
User Rank
Platinum
Saturn Goo Experiences?
David12345   7/1/2011 3:47:56 PM
NO RATINGS
My daughter had a 1997 Saturn SL1.  It was a basic car and the styling was not that exciting; however, it was reliable, peppy, got good mileage, and did reasonably well in the snow.

When her car got nailed in a parking lot the internal door repairs and cost of the skin was much higher than a comparable repair in most steel skinned economy cars.  She did have it repaired and sold it years later with over 130,000 miles on it.

I think they were basically good cars, but the concept was not as cheap to produce; so, they probably operated with smaller business margins than alternate material choices.

plasticmaster
User Rank
Silver
CLTE & Designing outside the box
plasticmaster   7/1/2011 12:21:45 AM
NO RATINGS
Because of Plastic's high CLTE, "they grew and shrank when the temperature changed, requiring the cars to have wide, unappealing gaps around the doors, hood and trunk for clearance."

Looks like we need to go back to the drawing board and re-address the "gap" in our designs.

If gaps are a problem, figure out a way to either eliminate them through material selection or rethinking the mechanical design. You could also "hide" them or turn them into a feature so they work into the design.

I guess my opinion is simple: if you've got a problem, figure out a way to fix it (cost effectively)...don't give up.

(yeah, yeah, I know about wasting time and money on something that is difficult to solve can ruin your ROI, but somebody has to be idealistic!)

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
Fiero
Tim   6/29/2011 8:48:53 PM
NO RATINGS
In college, I had a professor who spent a lot of time in his processing days producing (or attempting to produce) car panels for the Pontiac Fiero.  The major problems that they had were material flow issues and eliminating flow lines in the panels.  I am sure that by now these issues should be resolved.  At least we hope son.

Andreas Tanda
User Rank
Silver
Re: Environmental stress cracking
Andreas Tanda   6/29/2011 7:45:26 AM
NO RATINGS
You mentioned UV, but environmental stress cracking phenomenas can also occur because of introducing additional materials, you did not consider during the design process of the product. For example customers adding a adhesive sticker containing a bad adhesive or solvent on top of your surface, can nicely lead to induce micro cracking. Cleaning agents are also always a very hot topic regarding environmental stress cracking.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
CLTE
TJ McDermott   6/29/2011 2:51:15 AM
NO RATINGS
That's going to be a tough one.  Lockheed's SR71 supposedly leaked fuel like a sieve before takeoff because it was designed for the temperatures it encountered flying Mach 3.

We could climb in through the top, and have the body panels be single piece full length...

plasticmaster
User Rank
Silver
Re: Environmental stress cracking
plasticmaster   6/28/2011 10:16:38 PM
NO RATINGS
I wouldn't use anything with ABS in it if its intended purpose was to be outside. UV just kills it. There are so many other materials out there to choose from, I too wonder why they would pick PC/ABS.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Environmental stress cracking
Dave Palmer   6/28/2011 9:43:08 PM
NO RATINGS
PC/ABS is also notoriously susceptible to environmental stress cracking. It has a lot of good points, too, such as high impact strength, but the chemical incompatibilities are an Achilles heel. I am very hesitant to recommend it. I might pick up a copy of Bob Lutz's book. He has a reputation for being a straight talker.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Saturn body panels
Charles Murray   6/28/2011 3:10:26 PM
NO RATINGS
In its commercials, Saturn made a big deal out of its plastic body panels. Back in 1990, consumers who recognized the Saturn name associated it first with the plastic panels. So all of us wondered why the rest of the industry didn't adopt plastic. Now, thanks to Lutz's book, we know why. The irony is that many of us who have owned Saturns (I still own a Saturn Ion) like the plastic panels. They may be finicky, as Lutz says, but most Saturns were purchased for their low price and reliability, not for fit and finish.

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: Looking back, was the Saturn really a good car?
Jennifer Campbell   6/28/2011 3:10:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Just came across this post in our Made by Monkeys blog. It's not about the plastic body panels, but answers my question about problems with the car in general.

Page 1/2  >  >>


Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The damage to Sony from the cyber attack seems to have been heightened by failure to follow two basic security rules.
Voting in Round 4 of our annual Gadget Freak of the Year contest is now open.
Reshoring is picking up steam, but it's not outpacing the overall continuing growth in outsourcing.
Here's a variety of views into the complex production processes at Santa's factory. Happy Holidays!
The Beam Store from Suitable Technologies is managed by remote workers from places as diverse as New York and Sydney, Australia. Employees attend to store visitors through Beam Smart Presence Systems (SPSs) from the company. The systems combine mobility and video conferencing and allow people to communicate directly from a remote location via a screen as well as move around as if they are actually in the room.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service