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David12345
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Platinum
Re: oof!
David12345   7/1/2011 10:04:55 AM
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LOL.  Swing batter.

Seriously about the debris, I think the plan with this would be to locate the boundary barriers far enough from the facility being protected that the debris is a moot point.  I would expect fixed barriers most of the way around that facility and this movable barrier would be activated most the time; except, when deliveries needed to enter.  Ideally, there would be a dual lock with a buffer in between; so that, both barriiers would never need to be down at the same time.  

More than debris, I would be more concerned about flammable/explosive liquids, such as a semi-trailer gasoline tanker and a burning torch on the back; hence, more reason for the buffer distance requirements.With adequate buffer distance, strategically located storm drains to a holding reservoir could at least direct the flames of the gasoline truck scenerio to a mostly managed location.

 

Steve Saunders
User Rank
Iron
Re: oof!
Steve Saunders   6/28/2011 2:13:09 PM
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this engineering stuff is easy! :-) 

Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
Re: oof!
Lauren Muskett   6/28/2011 2:09:45 PM
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I think you are on to something! 

Steve Saunders
User Rank
Iron
Re: oof!
Steve Saunders   6/28/2011 1:55:57 PM
NO RATINGS
1. giant net

2. interns with mitts 

Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
Re: oof!
Lauren Muskett   6/28/2011 1:04:55 PM
NO RATINGS
This video is impressive, however I wonder if there is a way to better control the flying debris.

Steve Saunders
User Rank
Iron
oof!
Steve Saunders   6/24/2011 1:23:29 PM
NO RATINGS
impressive



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