HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
REGISTER   |   LOGIN   |   HELP
Comments
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
Great Idea
Lauren Muskett   6/23/2011 1:42:41 PM
NO RATINGS
This is such an interesting gadget and the best part about it is that there are no permanent modifications needed to the typewriter.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Typewriter Keyboard Workout
Jack Rupert, PE   6/23/2011 3:00:10 PM
NO RATINGS
That will sure give your fingers a good workout for strengthening.  I wonder how long a person could use one of those for actual work.  When I was in high school, I learned to type on an IBM Selectric.  However, my mom, a secretary in her previous life, had a manual as well.  I kept away from that thing.

tfloto
User Rank
Iron
Selectrics
tfloto   7/7/2011 2:12:32 PM
NO RATINGS
In the early eighties there were mods to the selectric to turn it into a keyboard and a printer for the early eight bit microprocessors and OS's. Dot matrix printers cost over four hundred dollars and key boards were about one hundred. Of course we modified everything from cassettes players (mass storage) to selectrics to save a few bucks. Ah.. the good old days

David McCollum
User Rank
Gold
Re: Selectrics
David McCollum   7/19/2011 10:36:09 AM
NO RATINGS
I recall in the late sixties my school had a Selectric that had an attachment that both made and ran from punched paper rolls, much the same as a player piano. It was primarily used to type many copies of the same letter, and it paused for an operator to insert each name, address, and salutation to keep the thing from looking like a form letter. It was not a home-built gadget, though; I think it came from IBM proper. Interestingly enough, the Selectric feel is still the de facto standard for keyboards.

Even though I'm a certified dinosaur, I gave up my typewriter the day I got a laser printer that would accept envelopes. Hi-Ho, mail-merge!

BobGroh
User Rank
Platinum
Warning! Contrarian viewpoint
BobGroh   7/13/2011 9:46:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Sometimes I think that some people just have too much time on their hands. Converting a manual typewriter (or even an electric one) to act as a keyboard?  Really? Or maybe I'm just jealous (nahhhhh!). 

If we crawled into the 'wayback' machine (e.g. back to 1978) back to the era when terminals for our new 8-bit computers cost a jillion dollars then maybe it would make sense (in fact it did as I sort of remember similiar ideas back then) but today?  Sorry I have too much else to do.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Eric Chesak created a sensor that can detect clouds, and it can also measure different sources of radiation.
Festo's BionicKangaroo combines pneumatic and electrical drive technology, plus very precise controls and condition monitoring. Like a real kangaroo, the BionicKangaroo robot harvests the kinetic energy of each takeoff and immediately uses it to power the next jump.
Practicing engineers have not heeded Yoda's words.
Design News and Digi-Key presents: Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX, a crash course that will look at defining a project, selecting a target processor, blocking code, defining tasks, completing code, and debugging.
Rockwell Automation recently unveiled a new safety relay that can be configured and integrated through existing software to program safety logic in devices.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
2/27/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York / 7:00 p.m. London
12/18/2013 Available On Demand
11/20/2013 Available On Demand
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 21 - 25, Creating & Testing Your First RTOS Application Using MQX
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: April 29 - Day 1
Sponsored by maxon precision motors
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service