HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Comments
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Loring Wirbel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: SCADA posting
Loring Wirbel   6/23/2011 5:23:58 PM
NO RATINGS
You're right about 64-bit as a future prospect.  NRT OS should have been staring me in the face, but I assumed such broad use of real-time kernels, it just sort of passed by me as a don't care - which is silly.  Thanks for comments.

 

jmacpherson
User Rank
Iron
SCADA posting
jmacpherson   6/23/2011 4:29:30 PM
NO RATINGS

Loring, The part I do find interesting is where you mention about controllers changing to 64-bit. Even though there appears to be development in this area considering that most plant floors just recently moved from Windows CE to Windows XP for OS, 64-bit is not supported on an OS until you get to Vista or higher.

You also mentioned two of the three communication needs within an industrial network. Real-time and hard-real-time. There is a third in between the two extremes which is non-real-time. These three communication needs each have timing associated with them and therefore must be processed differently. In today's designs an OEM is locked into one vendor for most products so they interact well within the network or the other option is using bridges which create latency in the communications. Therefore leapfrogging may work for some parts of the network process but not for all areas of need.

 


You have really given some good 'food for thought' here.

Loring Wirbel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Preaching to the choir
Loring Wirbel   6/23/2011 1:06:13 PM
NO RATINGS
What Jack R. mentioned is one reason why leapfrogging may be inevitable.  It seems that application software is often developed with an eye to what sounds cool, rather than the sense it makes to the overall SCADA environment.  A perfect example is the forementioned apps for Android and iPhone.  Even in the IT community, client smartphone apps are being developed for corporate access, and even some military-security applications, that don't seen to take into account the shakier security and stability environment of the self-invoking smartphone app.  When one hears of monitoring or security apps developed for SCADA systems, allowing process managers to check on a power system via an iPhone, there's something that screams "Ooops!  Don't want to go there!"  But we'll only learn of the hazards after the fact, requiring one or several more rounds of leapfrogging.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Application Holes
Jack Rupert, PE   6/23/2011 12:32:36 PM
NO RATINGS
The unfortunate thing with SCADA security is that the big hole is still the application software that in many cases is not being maintained (or possibly even developed) by people with an eye toward security.  A lot of the customers at my previous employer required access to the application to make "updates" online as well as download the program.  While in some cases, this type of access was regulated through a more secure method provided by their own IT department, in other cases they were not involved, opening up the same doors that STUXNET came through.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Preaching to the choir
Alexander Wolfe   6/23/2011 12:26:16 PM
NO RATINGS
On the one hand, it's always good news when vendors are able to cut the bad guys off at the knees, in this case by going to more advanced kernels, then beefing up networking protocols, and now looking at encryption. OTOH, one gets weary over the constant need to upgrade to stay that one little step ahead of the bad actors. Are we stuck with this leapfrogging scenario from here on out, Loring?

Loring Wirbel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Preaching to the choir
Loring Wirbel   6/23/2011 12:03:07 PM
NO RATINGS
No doubt Cyber Command is already looking into that at Fort Meade - and we'd be the last to know!

Terry Sweeney
User Rank
Iron
Preaching to the choir
Terry Sweeney   6/23/2011 11:46:38 AM
NO RATINGS
Really interesting, timely post, Loring -- as if industry and governments were sufficiently sensitized to the security issues you raise, Stuxnet made it abundantly clear what sort of havoc embedded malware could wreak. A larger security sensibility at this level is long overdue.



Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
A Frost & Sullivan study finds that increased cyber attacks are prompting a flurry of innovative protection tools.
Devices and interconnected systems are finding a foothold not only in our homes but in mainstream organizations. Here are three tips to mitigate the risk.
What makes this movie stand out from the typical high school sports story is that the teenagers are undocumented immigrants, and the big game is a NASA-sponsored marine robotics competition. Like many other Hollywood movies, however, Spare Parts only tells part of the story. What the film shows -- and doesn’t show -- raises important issues affecting STEM education in the US.
Instead of sifting through huge amounts of technical data looking for answers to assembly problems, engineers can now benefit from 3M's new initiative -- 3M Assembly Solutions. The company has organized its wealth of adhesive and tape solutions into six typical application areas, making it easier to find the best products to solve their real-world assembly and bonding problems.
Load dump occurs when a discharged battery is disconnected while the alternator is generating current and other loads remain on the alternator circuit. If left alone, the electrical spikes and transients will be transmitted along the power line, leading to malfunctions in individual electronics/sensors or permanent damage to the vehicle’s electronic system. Bottom line: An uncontrolled load dump threatens the overall safety and reliability of the vehicle.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Mar 30 - Apr3, Getting Hands-On with Cypress’ PSoC
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service