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Curriculum Calendar

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All class times are listed in Eastern Time
All classes will consist of a 45 minute lecture and an interactive chat session
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Questions? Please contact us here.
Archived Tracks
Testing Wireless Devices & Systems  
Monday, July 9 - Friday, July 13
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Jul 9
2PM
Introduction: Testing Wireless Devices & Systems
In this session, you will learn about wireless test methods, test standards, and test equipment used in R&D, quality assurance (QA), and production. We will cover performance, interoperability certification, and regression testing of mainstream wireless devices and systems, including WiFi, LTE, and other technologies. We will discuss hardware and software test methods and review test and certification standards from organizations including IEEE, IETF, 3GPP, PTCRB, and GCF.
  View Archived  
Fanny Mlinarsky  
Fanny Mlinarsky is President of octoScope, a wireless test solutions and services company. Her background includes hands-on product ...  
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Our Lecturer
Fanny Mlinarsky
Fanny Mlinarsky

Fanny Mlinarsky is President of octoScope, a wireless test solutions and services company. Her background includes hands-on product development and R&D management. Prior to octoScope Fanny was Founder and CTO of Azimuth Systems, a wireless test equipment vendor. She has been an active contributor to the wireless standards being developed at 802.11 and 3GPP. She has published more than 22 articles, 19 whitepapers, and 6 test reports on wireless technologies and standards. Fanny has delivered numerous presentations at industry forums and has developed highly rated online wireless technology courses.


HIDE
Jul 10
2PM
Part II: R&D Test
Today's lecture will cover R&D test methods and metrics applicable to wireless products. We will learn about performance and certification testing of RF and protocol layers. The material will include test methods for measuring radio range, data rate adaptation, roaming performance, throughput, and system level functionality.
  View Archived  
Jul 11
2PM
Part III: Quality Assurance Test
This lecture will examine QA test and test automation techniques. We will cover common test scripting and regression test methods and will discuss ways of reproducing field conditions and field failures.
  View Archived  
Jul 12
2PM
Part IV: Production Test
This lecture will cover the challenges associated with production testing of wireless hardware. We will discuss strategies for optimizing test speed, maximizing yields, and minimizing false failures. We will also examine test fixturing for over-the-air coupling to a wireless device under test (DUT).
  View Archived  
Jul 13
2PM
Part V: Deployment Test
This lecture will provide practical guidance on deployment testing in the field. We will discuss test methods, test equipment, and strategies for obtaining valid test results under variable field conditions and in the presence of interference. In addition, we will wrap up any loose ends from the previous days’ lectures and answer any remaining questions.
  View Archived  
Introduction to Electronics  
Monday, July 23 - Friday, July 27
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Jul 23
2PM
Part I: Fundamental Concepts
We introduce fundamental concepts, starting with protons, neutrons, and electrons, leading to molecules, crystals, etc., which leads to the difference between conductors and insulators. We consider voltage and current, resistance and resistors, capacitance and capacitors, and inductance and inductors. Next, we look at different ways to control electricity, from switches to relays to vacuum tubes to diodes and transistors. Finally, we see primitive logic functions like NOT, AND, and OR gates.
  View Archived  
Max Maxfield  
Clive "Max" Maxfield is six feet tall, outrageously handsome, English, and proud of it. In addition to being a hero, trendsetter, and ...  
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Our Lecturer
Max Maxfield
Max Maxfield

Clive "Max" Maxfield is six feet tall, outrageously handsome, English, and proud of it. In addition to being a hero, trendsetter, and leader of fashion, he is widely regarded as an expert in all aspects of electronics (at least by his mother). Max received his BSc in Control Engineering in 1980 from Sheffield Hallam University in Sheffield, UK. He began his career as a designer of central processing units (CPUs) for mainframe computers. Over the years, Max has designed everything from silicon chips to circuit boards, and from brainwave amplifiers to steampunk "Display-O-Meters." He has also been at the forefront of Electronic Design Automation (EDA) for more than 20 years. He's the author and/or co-author of a number of books, including Designus Maximus Unleashed (banned in Alabama), Bebop to the Boolean Boogie (An Unconventional Guide to Electronics), EDA: Where Electronics Begins, FPGAs: Instant Access, and How Computers Do Math.


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Jul 24
2PM
Part II: Analog vs. Digital
In this session, we will discover the difference between the analog and digital domains; the wide variety of analog sensor technologies that are available; the ways in which we can implement multi-value digital systems; the ways we sample analog values and convert them into their digital counterparts; the difference between analog signal processing (ASP) and digital signal processing (DSP), and much, much more...
  View Archived  
Jul 25
2PM
Part III: Chips & Packages
In this session, we discover different types of ICs, including analog, digital, mixed-signal, and radio frequency (RF). We will also introduce the concepts of microprocessors (MPUs), microcontrollers (MCUs), programmable devices (SPLDs, CPLDs, and FPGAs), and ASICs/ASSPs/SoCs. Different forms of memory (SRAM, DRAM, EEPROM, Flash, FRAM, MRAM, and PCM) will be introduced. Also discussed will be different forms of packaging, including System-in-Package (SiP) assemblies and 3D IC technologies.
  View Archived  
Jul 26
2PM
Part IV: Programmable Devices
In this session, we consider the earliest forms of programmable logic devices (PLDs), including PROMs, PLAs, PALs, and GALs, many of which are still in use to this day. Next we consider the evolution from simple PLDs (SPLDs) to complex PLDs (CPLDs). Also, we consider the problems with ASICs/SoCs and the gap between SPLDs/CPLDs and ASICs/SoCs that led to the introduction of FPGAs. In addition to discussing FPGAs in some detail, we consider the various programming technologies that may be used.
  View Archived  
Jul 27
2PM
Part V: Circuit Boards & Systems
Electronic components like integrated circuits are incredibly useful - but not when they're in isolation. The unsung hero of the electronics system world is the circuit board, which connects everything together. In this session, we will discover the origin of printed circuit board technology; single-sided, double-sided, and multi-layer circuit boards; and flexible circuit technologies. We will also consider electronic systems in general, leading to concepts like "The Internet of Things."
  View Archived  
Linux Kernel Debugging  
Monday, August 6 - Friday, August 10
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Aug 6
2PM
Intro: Introduction to Linux Debugging
During the first class, students will learn how to get code into the kernel with kernel loadable modules. They'll learn how problems manifest themselves in the kernel, specifically referring to kernel panics, kernel oops, and other improper behaviors. After analyzing panics/oops to find the next step, the class will wrap up by watching interactions between user-space and kernel space via strace.
  View Archived  
Michael Anderson  
Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group Inc. With over 35 years in the embedded and real-time computing ...  
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Our Lecturer
Michael Anderson
Michael Anderson

Mike Anderson is currently CTO and Chief Scientist for The PTR Group Inc. With over 35 years in the embedded and real-time computing industry, he works with a number of RTOS offerings. However, his focus over the past decade is primarily embedded Linux on various CPU architectures. As an instructor and consultant, Mike is a regular speaker at the Embedded Systems Conference, the Embedded Linux Conference, Android Builder's Summit, and other real-time and Linux-oriented conferences. Ongoing projects include several efforts focused on porting applications from legacy RTOS offerings to real-time enhanced Linux platforms. Additional projects include Android and its use in non-phone applications and Linux in high-performance computing platforms.


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Aug 7
2PM
Part II: Debugging With Printk & Instrumenting Code
On the second day of class, instructor Michael Anderson will cover how to debug with printk, how to handle instrumenting code with /proc and /sys entries, and more.
  View Archived  
Aug 8
2PM
Part III: The Ins & Outs of DebugFS
The third class lets the students virtually roll up their sleeves and begin enabling and using DebugFS. They'll also learn how to use kprobes, jprobes, and jretprobes. Finally, the SystemTap will be explained in detail.
  View Archived  
Aug 9
2PM
Part IV: The Nitty Gritty of Debugging
Getting down to the fine art of debugging, Anderson will go into detail on three operations: Ftrace, Oprofile, and LTTng. What these techniques mean and how they are applied will be the crux of this lesson.
  View Archived  
Aug 10
2PM
Part V: Compiling Your Kernel
The fifth and final course for the week will start with a demonstration on compiling the kernel with debugging information enabled. It then will delve in the KDB symbolic debugger/disassembler and KGDB source debugger. Before doing a wrap-up, Anderson will show how to employ hardware debuggers such as JTAGs.
  View Archived  
ARM Cortex-M0  
Monday, August 20 - Friday, August 24
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Aug 20
2PM
DAY 1: The 8 / 32 Bit Difference, an Overview
This discussion shows by example the advantages of the CORTEX-M0 architecture over older 8- or 16-bit small computer embedded architectures. Performance and code style advantages will be discussed. On-chip peripheral features of older devices will be contrasted with those of today’s modern devices. Our objective is to provide a well rounded understanding of the new 32-bit CORTEX-M0 landscape.
  View Archived  
Paul Nickelsberg  
Paul Nickelsberg is President and Chief Technical Officer of Orchid Technologies Engineering & Consulting Inc., an electronic product ...  
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Paul Nickelsberg
Paul Nickelsberg

Paul Nickelsberg is President and Chief Technical Officer of Orchid Technologies Engineering & Consulting Inc., an electronic product development engineering firm with strengths in high-end computing design, embedded system development, medical product design, instrumentation design, power system design, industrial product development, motion control, networking, and telecommunications. Mr. Nickelsberg has over 30 years experience as a technical innovator and problem solver. He has participated in the design of medical products in the areas of cardiology, video imaging, x-ray imaging, MRI-imaging, fluoroscopic drug discovery, forced hot-air patient warming devices, and urology. He holds a number of US patents in electronic instrumentation design. Prior to Orchid Mr. Nickelsberg worked for BBN Communications Inc. and Digital Equipment Corp. He also taught courses at MIT's Lowell Institute of Technology. He earned his BS in electrical engineering from Union College in Schenectady, N.Y.


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Aug 21
2PM
DAY2: CORTEX-M0 Structure, Discussion 1
This discussion is the first of three views into the details of the CORTEX-M0 processor features. Presented from the point of view of an embedded system designer, this discussion will address four different aspects of the CORTEX-M0 processor. They include the instruction set, the memory map, the register set, and the execution modes.
  View Archived  
Aug 22
2PM
DAY3: CORTEX-M0 Structure, Discussion 2
This discussion is the second of three views into the details of the CORTEX-M0 processor features. Presented from the point of view of an embedded system designer, this discussion will address the following features of the CORTEX-M0 processor: the SYSTICK core peripheral, the NVIC core peripheral, the SCB core peripheral, and the MPC core peripheral.
  View Archived  
Aug 23
2PM
DAY4: CORTEX-M0 Structure, Discussion 3
This discussion is the third of three views into the details of the CORTEX-M0 processor features. Presented from the point of view of an embedded system designer, this discussion will address four of the key features of the CORTEX-M0 processor, which provide the competitive advantage the M0 is famous for. Those areas are power management, exception handling, stack structures, and SVC/WFE/WFI instructions.
  View Archived  
Aug 24
2PM
DAY5: CORTEX-M0 in Commercial Components, Summer 2012
This discussion presents an overview of commercial CORTEX-M0 components. We present component families from Freescale, Nuvoton, NXP, and ST Microelectronics. This discussion provides insight into today’s available product. Our objective is to provide information about today’s commercial devices and how a designer might select a particular part.
  View Archived  
Fundamentals of Embedded Computer Vision: Creating Machines That See  
Monday, September 10 - Friday, September 14
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Sep 10
2PM
Day 1: Introduction to Embedded Vision
In this course we introduce embedded vision – the incorporation of computer vision techniques into embedded systems. Via case studies, we explore the functionality that systems can gain with embedded vision and provide a taste of typical vision algorithms. We also discuss technology trends that are enabling embedded vision to be used in cost-, energy- and size-limited applications, and we highlight challenges that must be addressed in integrating embedded vision capabilities into systems.
  View Archived  
Jeff Bier  
Jeff Bier, an expert on embedded processors, is founder of the Embedded Vision Alliance, an industry partnership that works to inspire ...  
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Jeff Bier
Jeff Bier

Jeff Bier, an expert on embedded processors, is founder of the Embedded Vision Alliance, an industry partnership that works to inspire and empower designers to create more capable and responsive products through integration of vision capabilities. The Alliance provides training videos, tutorial articles, code examples, and an array of other resources (all free of charge) on its web site, www.Embedded-Vision.com. Jeff is also co-founder and president of Berkeley Design Technology, Inc. (www.BDTI.com), offering independent analysis and specialized engineering services in the realm of embedded digital signal processing technology.


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Sep 11
2PM
Day 2: Fundamentals of Image Sensors for Embedded Vision
Image sensors are the "eyes" of embedded vision systems, and their characteristics largely determine the capabilities of the systems on which they are built. In this session, we introduce the most common types of 2D and 3D sensors used in embedded vision applications and explore their strengths and weaknesses. We also highlight recent developments in sensor technology.
  View Archived  
Sep 12
2PM
Day 3: Processor Choices for Embedded Vision
Embedded vision applications typically make heavy demands on processors – not just in terms of processing performance, but also regarding memory, I/O, and real-time behavior. In this class, we explore the processor requirements of embedded vision applications in quantitative and qualitative terms. We then discuss the six main types of processor used in embedded vision applications, highlighting their key strengths and weaknesses and how they are evolving over time.
  View Archived  
Sep 13
2PM
Day 4: Introduction to Vision Algorithms and Some Free Tools
At the heart of embedded vision are algorithms. These include algorithms for improving captured images, identifying features of interest, inferring the presence of objects, and reasoning about objects and motion. In this class, we introduce some fundamental algorithms, such as motion and line detection. We explain how these algorithms work, and illustrate them with demos (which are available for download). We also introduce OpenCV, which is a free, open source vision software library.
  View Archived  
Sep 14
2PM
Day 5: More Algorithms and More on Using OpenCV
Here, we present more complex embedded vision algorithm examples, including face detection and object tracking. As in the preceding session, we explain how these algorithms work, through demonstrations built with OpenCV. We also illustrate a quick and easy way to set up your own vision algorithm development environment using OpenCV. Finally, we provide pointers to additional resources for learning about embedded vision.
  View Archived  
Introduction to Prototyping an LED Driver: From Design to Layout to PCB  
Monday, September 24 - Friday, September 28
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Sep 24
2PM
Part 1: Driver Design & Component Selection
We start off this series with an overview of the prototyping process from a circuit design to schematic capture to circuit board layout. We'll be using the example of the LED driver design using the HV9910 that we discussed in "Advanced LEDs & Displays" in May. In this first class, we'll start with a quick review of the circuit, then go over the Bill of Materials and start the component selection process using the DigiKey Website.
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Carol Lenk  
Carol Lenk is an MIT-educated entrepreneur who was a founder of the venture-backed LED developer, Superbulbs, and is currently ...  
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Carol Lenk
Carol Lenk

Carol Lenk is an MIT-educated entrepreneur who was a founder of the venture-backed LED developer, Superbulbs, and is currently associated with Reliabulb. She is co-author of the book, Practical Lighting Design with LEDS. She has a BS in Electrical Engineering from MIT and a Masters in Math and Science Education. One of the early pioneers in applying LEDs to general lighting, Lenk has five years of experience in combining theoretical concepts with practical engineering in fields as diverse as optics, thermal modeling, material science, electronics, and mechanical design. She has more than a dozen US and worldwide patents-pending related to LED lighting.


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Sep 25
2PM
Part 2: Using PCB Layout Software: Schematic Capture & Component Libraries
This second class will start with an overview of circuit board layout software. Continuing on with our LED driver, we'll be using freeware to capture the schematic of our design using built-in library components. Then we'll see the real power of the software as the captured circuit is translated into PCB footprints. This allows us to lay down copper traces on the board.
  View Archived  
Sep 26
2PM
Part 3: Using PCB Layout Software: Custom Component Libraries
If we need a component that is not in the provided libraries and not found in online user groups, we can always create our own components. We'll go through a few examples and use as much copy-and-paste as possible to create custom symbols and footprints for our custom components. We'll also cover the common footprint design guidelines, such as pad size and spacing tolerance, and using Eagle layout designer to create custom library components to fit our needs.
  View Archived  
Sep 27
2PM
Part 4: Finishing the Layout: Finishing Touches & Design Rule Check
To finish the layout, we'll need to add some vias for soldering on the wires. We'll also add some text to the board and fill in some extra copper to help with heat dissipation. Then we'll cover some power-supply-oriented design rules and show how to set up the program to do a Design Rule Check.
  View Archived  
Sep 28
2PM
Part 5: PCB Fabrication: Gerber Files & Ordering PCB
Today is the clincher, to take our layout and generate manufacturing files commonly called Gerber files as well as the Bill of Materials (BOM). Then we'll use a Gerber viewer to review the files. We'll then go over the process of how to specify and get a quote from a PCB manufacturer.
  View Archived  
Understanding Smart Sensors  
Monday, October 8 - Friday, October 12
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Oct 8
2PM
Oct 8 - Part I: Sensor Specs 101
Obtaining the expected performance for a sensor in a system requires a solid understanding of the terms used to specify performance. In many cases, it is absolutely necessary to sort through the marketing hype about a sensor's capability, but even data sheets are non-uniform and can be confusing. In this course, our expert explains the essentials to avoid application pitfalls.
  View Archived  
Randy Frank  
Randy Frank is President of Randy Frank & Associates Ltd., a consultancy that focuses on sensors, power, and automotive electronics. At ...  
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Randy Frank
Randy Frank

Randy Frank is President of Randy Frank & Associates Ltd., a consultancy that focuses on sensors, power, and automotive electronics. At Motorola, he was actively involved in the introduction of highly integrated pressure sensors and accelerometers that use microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology. Previously, he was responsible for the development of the first engine control systems, including all of the sensing aspects for America Motors and Jeep vehicles, now part of the Chrysler Group. During that time, he taught advanced instrumentation and control at the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Randy is a Fellow in both the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) and the IEEE and author of the book Understanding Smart Sensors, 3rd Edition, which was released in 2013.


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Oct 9
2PM
Oct 9 - Part II: Basics of Specifying/Selecting Pressure Sensors
Pressure sensors provide one of the most frequent physical measurements. These sensors also have several nuances that can cause problems for those who do not work with them on a frequent basis. Our lecturer will discuss the issues in this tutorial.
  View Archived  
Oct 10
2PM
Oct 10 - Part III: Fundamentals of Smart Sensors
Many technologies contribute to improving sensors that frequently get dubbed "smart sensors." The "smart" term is used loosely in many technical and non-technical areas, so what makes a sensor smart? Find out from our expert in this session.
  View Archived  
Oct 11
2PM
Oct 11 - Part IV: Current Hot Topic 1: Energy Harvesting – Using Energy Harvesting to Power Wireless Sensors
Energy harvesting, or using the energy present in an application to recharge batteries or avoid their use entirely, can provide a sensing system that operates indefinitely. Knowing the capabilities of various energy harvesting techniques and understanding the energy budget are essential to the successful application of these designs. This tutorial provides the potential user with background as well as the design tools to get started.
  View Archived  
Oct 12
2PM
Oct 12 - Part V: Current Hot Topic 2: Sensor Fusion – Using the Newest Techniques for Advanced Sensors
Sensor fusion is an area that is rapidly advancing sensors' capabilities. The technology appears in automobiles, portable consumer electronics, and several other areas that affect daily life. In this tutorial, our expert will start with the basics and end with tools that can help interested listeners get first-hand experience in using and implementing sensor fusion.
  View Archived  
Fundamentals of Electrical Power Measurement  
Monday, October 22 - Friday, October 26
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Oct 22
2PM
Oct. 22 - P. 1: The Basics of Electrical Power Measurement
Part 1 of this course will define basic terms, explain why power (and energy) measurement is needed, clarify what will and won't be covered, and explore what the role and reality of power measurement is. It will also provide an overview of the remaining parts of the course.
  View Archived  
Bill Schweber  
Bill Schweber is an electronics engineer who has written three textbooks on electronic communications systems, as well as hundreds of ...  
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Bill Schweber
Bill Schweber

Bill Schweber is an electronics engineer who has written three textbooks on electronic communications systems, as well as hundreds of technical articles, opinion columns, and product features. In past roles, he worked as a technical Website manager for multiple topic-specific sites for EE Times and as both Executive Editor and Analog Editor at EDN.


At Analog Devices Inc., a leading vendor of analog and mixed-signal ICs, Bill was in marketing communications (public relations); as a result, he has been on both sides of the technical PR function, presenting company products, stories, and messages to the media and also as the recipient of these. Prior to the marketing communications role at Analog, he was associate editor of its respected technical journal, and also worked in its product marketing and applications engineering groups. Before those roles, he was at Instron Corp., doing hands-on analog- and power-circuit design and systems integration for materials-testing machine controls.


He has an MSEE (U Mass) and BSEE (Columbia), is a Registered Professional Engineer, and holds an Advanced Class amateur radio license. Bill has also planned, written, and presented online courses on a variety of engineering topics, including MOSFET basics, ADC selection, and driving LEDs.


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Oct 23
2PM
Oct. 23 - P. 2: The 4 Most Common Transducer Types
Part 2 looks at the four most-used transducer types (shunt resistor, transformer coil, Rogowski coil, and Hall devices) and their key attributes and tradeoffs, use for AC vs. DC vs. transient power measurement, and low, medium, and high-power regimes.
  View Archived  
Oct 24
2PM
Oct. 24 - P. 3: The Basics of Electrical Circuitry
Part 3 examines the electrical circuitry needed to interface the various sensors, safety issues for the system, the misunderstood term and concept of "ground," and floating/differential measurement situations.
  View Archived  
Oct 25
2PM
Oct. 25 - P. 4: Obtain (& Understand) Meaningful Power Information
Part 4 looks at taking the signals from transducers and converting them into useful information via analog and digital techniques to get meaningful power information, accuracy readings, and data analysis.
  View Archived  
Oct 26
2PM
Oct. 26 - P. 5: Instrumentation for Power Measurement
Part 5 discusses available power-related instrumentation that may be applicable to many situations (multimeters, scopes, power meters, source measurement units, among others), as well as implementation issues in practical systems, including 2/4-lead measurements, noise, loops, and other issues.
  View Archived  
Writing Reusable C Code for Embedded Systems  
Monday, November 12 - Friday, November 16
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Nov 12
2PM
Nov 12 - Day 1: Introduction, Myths & Why
Much is written about reusable C++ code. But most embedded systems code is still written in C. Embedded systems add additional impact to reusability. Today’s course will discuss myths and reasons for reusable code, along with the topics covered this week on writing reusable code in C.
  View Archived  
Gary Stringham  
Gary Stringham is an embedded systems expert with a specialization in the interface between firmware and hardware. He is the founder of ...  
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Gary Stringham
Gary Stringham

Gary Stringham is an embedded systems expert with a specialization in the interface between firmware and hardware. He is the founder of Gary Stringham & Associates LLC. With more than 25 years of industry experience, Stringham focuses on diagnosing and resolving difficult hardware/firmware integration issues and produces solid solutions to prevent future occurrences of those issues. He is the author of Hardware/Firmware Interface Design: Best Practices for Improving Embedded Systems Development. Previously, Stringham was a technical lead at HP, establishing standards in firmware and ASIC designs.


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Nov 13
2PM
Nov 13 - Day 2: Writing Code That Is Reusable Through Commonality
One approach to reusability is to require that the domain of the code and its adjacent modules conform to a specification. Today’s course will discuss the pros and cons, and give tips, techniques, and examples of this approach for code written to be common across implementations.
  View Archived  
Nov 14
2PM
Nov 14 - Day 3: Writing Code That Is Reusable Through Flexibility
Another approach to reusability is to structure the code so that it can easily be adapted to the specific requirements of the product. Today’s course will discuss pros, cons, tips, techniques, limitations, and examples of this approach to writing flexible code.
  View Archived  
Nov 15
2PM
Nov 15 - Day 4: Additional Approaches to Support Code Reusability
Today’s course will discuss other tips and techniques for reusability. One such area is how hardware can support software reusability.
  View Archived  
Nov 16
2PM
Nov 16 - Day 5: Reusable Code Tests & Concluding Remarks
Code written to support a variety of products requires additional testing to ensure correct behavior when instantiated for future configurations that may or may not occur. Today’s course will discuss these tests, give a review of the week, and make final remarks on reusability.
  View Archived  
Embedding USB Technology: Limitations, Challenges & Compliance  
Monday, November 26 - Friday, November 30
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Nov 26
2PM
Nov 26 - Day 1: Implementing USB in Embedded Products
Day 1 begins with a discussion about implementing USB technology in embedded products. This task can be challenging because of the restricted hardware resources available in embedded systems. USB topology is presented, which is a determining factor in what you can and cannot do with this technology. Finally, the mechanical specifications of USB are described.
  View Archived  
Christian Legare  
Christian Légaré has a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Sherbrooke, Quebec, ...  
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Christian Légaré
Christian Légaré

Christian Légaré has a Master's degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada. In his 22 years in the telecom industry, he taught classes and gave numerous training sessions to customers. He was involved as an executive in large-scale organizations as well as startups, mainly in engineering and R&D. Christian was in charge of an IP (Internet Protocol) certification program at the International Institute of Telecom (IIT) in Montreal, Canada, as its IP systems expert. Since 2002, he is Executive Vice President and CTO of Micrium, home of µC/OS-II and µC/OS-III real-time kernels. He is the author of µC/TCP-IP: The Embedded Protocol Stack.


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Nov 27
2PM
Nov 27 - Day 2: USB Over a Single Wire Pair
Day 2 presents the methods and circuitry used in USB 1.1 and USB 2.0 to transmit and receive data over a single wire pair. The methods for USB 3.0 are also presented. The physical layer is examined. For compliance purposes, it is often sufficient to follow the semiconductor vendor reference designs.
  View Archived  
Nov 28
2PM
Nov 28 - Day 3: Understanding the USB Protocol
Day 3 presents the complex structure of the USB protocol, which operates above the basic level of transmission and reception of bits over copper wires. Discussed are the concepts of USB packets, transfers, transactions, frames, and endpoints. These concepts are essential to meet performance expectations.
  View Archived  
Nov 29
2PM
Nov 29 - Day 4: USB From the Device Side
Day 4 is all about USB devices -- what they are, and what they can be. When a USB device is first connected to the bus, it triggers a process called enumeration. This event is a crucial phase of the USB protocol. USB classes are also presented, which allow USB devices to take on multiple functions.
  View Archived  
Nov 30
2PM
Nov 30 - Day 5: USB From the Host Side
Day 5 begins with a discussion of USB hosts, which are the most complex component in USB technology. We then are able to draw the differences between device, host, and on-the-go USB software stacks. The memory footprint for typical hosts and devices is described. Finally, the requirements for USB compliance are explained.
  View Archived  
ISM Band Radio  
Monday, December 3 - Friday, December 7
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Dec 3
2PM
Dec 3 - DAY 1: Navigating FCC Regulations
Federal Communications Commission rules and regulations are confusing. This discussion helps you to sort out the relevant portions of FCR 47 as it applies to ISM radio for 802.15.4-style data communications. The discussion limits its focus to regulatory matters in the United States.
  View Archived  
Paul Nickelsberg  
Paul Nickelsberg is President and Chief Technical Officer of Orchid Technologies Engineering & Consulting Inc., an electronic product ...  
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Paul Nickelsberg
Paul Nickelsberg

Paul Nickelsberg is President and Chief Technical Officer of Orchid Technologies Engineering & Consulting Inc., an electronic product development engineering firm with strengths in high-end computing design, embedded system development, medical product design, instrumentation design, power system design, industrial product development, motion control, networking, and telecommunications. Mr. Nickelsberg has over 30 years experience as a technical innovator and problem solver. He has participated in the design of medical products in the areas of cardiology, video imaging, x-ray imaging, MRI-imaging, fluoroscopic drug discovery, forced hot-air patient warming devices, and urology. He holds a number of US patents in electronic instrumentation design. Prior to Orchid Mr. Nickelsberg worked for BBN Communications Inc. and Digital Equipment Corp. He also taught courses at MIT's Lowell Institute of Technology. He earned his BS in electrical engineering from Union College in Schenectady, N.Y.


HIDE
Dec 4
2PM
Dec 4 - DAY 2: 802.15.4 Radio Link Modulation
This discussion takes as its focus the 802.15.4 standard as it applies to radios operating at 2.4GHz. We consider 802.15.4 modulation, the concept of "chips" and direct spread spectrum modulation, data throughput, and alternate modulation techniques.
  View Archived  
Dec 5
2PM
Dec 5 - DAY 3: 802.15.4 Radio Protocols & Topology
This discussion considers the 802.15.4 communications protocols. We address various operating protocols, taking a look at Zigbee and competing protocols. We also address 802.15.4 radio operating topologies such as star, star-mesh, mesh, and adaptive mesh approaches.
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Dec 6
2PM
Dec 6 - DAY 4: 802.15.4 Radio Design Factors
This discussion addresses factors that affect radio communications and small radio design. Range, power, and data transfer rate together with physical size, weight, and cost impact design choices. We will speak about link budget, operating frequency, and antenna considerations. The discussion reviews power requirements for typical 802.15.4 radio systems.
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Dec 7
2PM
Dec 7 - DAY 5: 802.15.4 Transceivers in Commercial Components – Fall 2012
This discussion presents an overview of commercial 802.15.4 components. We present component families from Atmel, Freescale, NXP, ST Microelectronics, and Texas Instruments. This discussion provides insight into today's available product offering.
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ZigBee: Basics to Implementation  
Monday, December 17 - Friday, December 21
Date Class   Status   Lecturer
Dec 17
2PM
Dec 17 - DAY 1: Executive Overview - What is ZigBee, Anyway?
Much is being said about the ZigBee protocol and its promise for low-power and dependable mesh networking, but what does ZigBee entail and what does it mean for a company that is thinking of incorporating it? We will discuss just what the standard and protocol are about, its history, and where it is going.
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Charles J. Lord  
Charles J. Lord, PE, is an embedded systems consultant and trainer with over 30 years' experience in system design and development in ...  
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Our Lecturer
Charles J. Lord
Charles J. Lord

Charles J. Lord, PE, is an embedded systems consultant and trainer with over 30 years' experience in system design and development in medical, military, and industrial applications. For the last eight years, he has specialized in the integration of communication protocols into clients' products, including USB, Ethernet, and low-power wireless including ZigBee. He has taught classes in these protocols for Freescale, Renesas, various universities and conferences including ESC, and his previous company, Triangle Advanced Design and Automation. He has been a design partner with Freescale, Microchip, and Renesas. He earned his BS in electrical engineering from N.C. State University in Raleigh, N.C. and provides training and consulting services through his company, Blue Ridge Advanced Design, in Asheville, N.C.


HIDE
Dec 18
2PM
Dec 18 - DAY 2: The Heart of ZigBee, the IEEE 802.15.4 Standard and Networking
We will discuss the IEEE standard on which ZigBee is built (and was developed for ZigBee) - IEEE 802.15.4. We will look at network layers, topology, and how the standard itself provides for extreme low-power communications.
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Dec 19
2PM
Dec 19 - DAY 3: ZigBee in Depth Part 1
Profiles one of the primary selling points for ZigBee is the guaranteed interoperability between nodes, regardless of who made the equipment. This is assured by the use of profiles that are established by the ZigBee Alliance and are independent of any one manufacturer. We will look at the established profiles and how they operate.
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Dec 20
2PM
Dec 20 - DAY 4: ZigBee in Depth Part 2
The Operating Details Under each profile is a set of operating protocols for sending set data. We will look at the structure and operation of these. We will also look at how one may use the strong structure of ZigBee to build a proprietary profile, gaining from the advantages of the protocol while providing for your unique communications and control needs.
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Dec 21
2PM
Dec 21 - DAY 5: Practical Design Criteria: Testing, Alternatives, Lessons from the Field
We look at the real engineering behind a ZigBee implementation: How to make it WORK. Design criteria, development, testing, and some lessons learned of things that worked - and didn't. We will also look at alternatives through a couple of very short case studies.
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