HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Materials & Assembly

Wearable Fabric Could Power Your iPhone

NO RATINGS
1 saves
< Previous Page 2 / 2
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Fashion knows best
Beth Stackpole   3/1/2012 6:54:39 AM
NO RATINGS
Wow, this is really cool stuff. Think about all the crazy applications and gear that would come out by taking advantage of this technology. I would imagine beyond powering up simple consumer devices, there could be huge applicability for life-saving medical applications.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Carbon
naperlou   3/1/2012 9:06:20 AM
NO RATINGS

Another interesting application of carbon nanotubes.  This is a very interesting technology, and very appropriate for so many of the devices we use every day.  With the advent of platforms that use ultra-low power processors the applications should be wide.  It is also interesting to contemplate using the waste heat from a device to power that device. 

 

Years ago there was a push on for ubiquitous, wearable computing devices.  These were seen as wearable computing platforms.  This is a technology that might help bring that area of research back. 

 

Another interesting aspect of this is the parallel with nuclear space power.  Although there have been active nuclear power generation systems for space, these have been rare.  One of the issues, of course, was the moving machinery.  The most common type of nuclear space power is the RTG, or Radioisotope Thermal Generator, converted a delta-T to a delta-V.  And there are no moving parts.  These are the devices that power the interplanetary flights.  The principle is the same, but the materials completely different.  Of course, you would not want to wear a RTG since the heat source is pure plutonium. 

 

Kevin Harper
User Rank
Iron
It's all about Efficiency
Kevin Harper   3/1/2012 9:42:48 AM
NO RATINGS
There are much better applications for future uses of the Thermo-Electric effect as mentioned by the researchers in another article:

"We waste a lot of energy in the form of heat. For example, recapturing a car's energy waste could help improve fuel mileage and power the radio, air conditioning or navigation system," Hewitt says.

The key as with any energy product will be efficiency.  It appears that they have not reached the efficiency of current materials.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Fashion knows best
Ann R. Thryft   3/1/2012 12:50:05 PM
NO RATINGS

There do seem to be a lot of interesting and novel materials applications coming out that are based on, or incorporate, CNTs as an important ingredient. I wrote about some early methods for constructing CNTs about a decade ago and wondered how long it would take to see them start to be actually used. 

naperlou, I remember the push for wearable devices you are referring to. It actually wasn't that long ago, a decade or less. I seem to remember that keeping them powered was a problem. Looks like we're getting closer to that solution.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
No need for motion
Rob Spiegel   3/1/2012 1:38:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice article, Ann. One thing I like about this material is that it's not based on movement or vibration. The U.S. Military is using a wearable generator attached to the boot. But it requires movement. The self-charging batteries for remote sensors rely on vibration. A power generator based on temperature variations wouldn't require motion or vibration. Cool.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: No need for motion
Ann R. Thryft   3/1/2012 2:43:23 PM
NO RATINGS

Thanks Rob. Good point about not needing movement to activate energy harvesting, like that Army boot. OTOH, considering the amount of walking around soldiers do, it makes sense that the military would be looking at apps that harvest energy from movement. And also considering the lack of exercise many people get, it might make more sense to motivate us by working on movement-activated energy harvesting for consumer devices. I guess it makes sense to have different technologies that can harvest different kinds of energy.


Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: No need for motion
Mydesign   3/1/2012 10:03:30 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Ann, if such innovations are happening, it’s a bonus for the gadget users. Most of us experience the power crunch, while using phones/IPad/ Smartphones. So whenever the battery power goes down below a certain level, it can be recharges immediately from the fabric, wonderful idea and hope then onwards no power drain.

vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
Wearable Fabric Could Power Your iPhone
vimalkumarp   3/2/2012 3:47:38 AM
NO RATINGS
Energy harvesting is the need of he hour. Autonomous systems with energy harvesting will offer better workflow soultions and that will in turn result in better products. I am working on a structural health monitoring system with energy harvesting and I know and I am sure like this wearable fabric may other invention will soon see the light of the day in coming days.

rlounsbu
User Rank
Iron
Motion and Heat together
rlounsbu   3/2/2012 9:54:19 AM
NO RATINGS
To the user wearing the fabric it would provide a cooling effect.  This would be advantagious for the foot soldier, especially when also wearing the boot generator.  Overall efficiency is increased when both are employed together.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
static cling
ChasChas   3/2/2012 10:27:18 AM
NO RATINGS
You think you have a problem with static cling on your clothes now - this aught to be a doozy.

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team £100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service