HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

Toyota, Audi Demo Self-Driving Technologies at CES

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Re: NOT on public roads
Mydesign   1/15/2013 5:10:07 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
"There is an application for this in places that have private roads in wilderness areas, tunnels, etc., but NOT on public roads"

Rigby5, I think it's a general mindset of peoples, about the security concerns. I don't think there is any need of fear about it. Auto navigation systems will take care about colloid free journey even in busy streets.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Self-Driving Technologies
Elizabeth M   1/15/2013 4:40:07 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point about the driverless trains, but you have to remember that is on a track and there aren't other trains (or cars) around also driving to create possible interference or cause an accident. I guess I didn't think about the idea of a commute...it seems like a good idea if a car can just be programmed to go on a set path and follow a route while the driver can kick back and relax. But then I see a future with cars all moving on tracks and everything being automated and predictable...again I tink it takes the fun and spontaneity out of driving. But that's just me!

Mydesign
User Rank
Platinum
Self driving and assistance
Mydesign   1/15/2013 3:53:37 AM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
Charles, quiet sometime I read the same from Google in Canada. Any updates about that. I think such vehicles will helps to reduce accidents and can offer safe journeys. So far we had seen only driving assisting systems only.

Rigby5
User Rank
Gold
NOT on public roads
Rigby5   1/14/2013 2:49:07 PM
NO RATINGS
There is an application for this in places that have private roads in wilderness areas, tunnels, etc., but NOT on public roads.

Sensors, decision making software, circuits, etc. are never going to be reliable enough, and the self accelerating Toyotas should have already convinced everyone to minimize electronic involvement.  Everything that can be done by humans, should be done by humans.  It is likely to be more than a century before this could ever be both reliable and cheap enough to be of use on public roads, and it may never be acceptible.

tnek
User Rank
Iron
Re: too many sensors
tnek   1/14/2013 2:00:54 PM
NO RATINGS
The human brain has too many connections to sensing mechanisms to expect a series of man-made devices to duplicate. Therefore if we expect to successfully develop a driverless car, we need to establish a control environment for it to operate within.

Imagine a freeway system designed to accept driverless cars. It must have destination lanes, lanes allowing the vehicle to enter the correct traffic lane. Lane changes must be controlled by establishing a speed and spacing control for each traffic lane. All of this can be controlled by satellite communications. There is an immediate problem with a factor known as peristaltic effect, or adding to a fixed series of moving lines without spreading them. The new vehicles must combine with the existing lines without making them wider. This requires controlling the beginning spacing based on the anticipated additions. Destinations must be entered in advance so that all calculations of traffic flow can be control planned. A reservation system could be used for a fixed length of travel but it must be maintained by each traveler.

Problems require solutions and with our current calculating capability, I am certain a solution could be forthcoming.

eafpres
User Rank
Gold
Re: Self-Driving Technologies
eafpres   1/14/2013 12:56:02 PM
NO RATINGS
At many airports you ride in driverless trains, and have been doing so for decades.  While a much simpler case, there is still the potential for error and human loss.  Somebody figured out the legal side of that, along with the technology.

I agree that driving can be fun; on the other hand sometimes a bus or train ride is really fun to relax, do some reading, have a real conversation, etc. and still get where you need to go.  Think about all the other technologies that have become "personal" (i.e., all the power in your smart phone, for example) and consider that many people will welcome the idea to hop in the car and tell it where to go, then sit back.  For them, it will be more enjoyable than the bus.

eafpres
User Rank
Gold
Re: too many sensors
eafpres   1/14/2013 12:50:57 PM
NO RATINGS
@naperlou--perhaps there is a relationship between the sophistication of the processor and the number of sensors required.  The human has hands and feet as actuators (and maybe voice for some functions) and eyes, ears, pressure, and touch (for vibration, g-force, etc.).  However, the human has the brain.  Fast microprocessors in the autonomous system can't match the intelligent processing of the brain.  Solution?  Add more sensors to break up the input into more digestible chunks and write multi-variable models to try and account for everything.

rohvemula
User Rank
Silver
Re: too many sensors
rohvemula   1/14/2013 12:42:00 PM
NO RATINGS
It is nice to know and support the innovation of new technology. Now this is the time to get more miles per gallon rather than investing money on this type of novelties.

I drive 2004 Lexus ES 330, as of today it gives 30 MPG on highway and 20 to 25 mixed MPG.  I donot find any new car give better milage than this.

I am in the market to buy fuel efficient car so that I can justfy buyinf new car.

 

 

apresher
User Rank
Blogger
Self-Driving Technologies
apresher   1/14/2013 11:32:32 AM
NO RATINGS
In the last month, Toyota agreed to pay about $1.1 billion to settle the class action lawsuit over unintended gas-pedal acceleration. Wonder if that will indirectly factor into the development of this technology.

jhankwitz
User Rank
Platinum
Self-Driving Concerns
jhankwitz   1/14/2013 10:54:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Two problems I see are litigated responsibility for accident injuries and consumers giving up their spot behind the wheel.  We're in love with our cars and it will take a lot to get us to turn them over to computers.

<<  <  Page 3/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
The Soofa is an urban smart bench that provides mobile device charging as well as collects environmental information via wireless sensors.
Sciaky, provider of electron-beam additive manufacturing (EBAM) services, will start selling these machines commercially in September. The company has used its EBAM 3D printing technology for making very large, high-value, metal prototypes and production parts for aerospace and defense OEMs.
At this year’s Google I/O, the spotlight was pointed on gender inequality in the high-tech industry. Google has established a new initiative that it hopes will even out the playing field, Made w/Code. Part of this initiative will fund free online courses in basic coding.
Self-driving vehicle technology could grow rapidly over the next two decades, with nearly 95 million “autonomous-capable” cars being sold annually around the world by 2035, a new study predicts.
MIT’s Senseable City Lab recently announced the program’s next big project: “Local Warming.” The concept involves saving on energy by heating the occupants within a room, not the room itself.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service