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Materials & Assembly
Plastic Makes a Better Light Bulb
1/8/2013

Wake Forest University scientists have devised a shatterproof, white light, flicker-free lighting device based on field-induced polymer electroluminescent (FIPEL) technology.   (Source: Wake Forest University)
Wake Forest University scientists have devised a shatterproof, white light, flicker-free lighting device based on field-induced polymer electroluminescent (FIPEL) technology.
(Source: Wake Forest University)

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LED_LIghtingCompany
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Iron
Re: Electroluminescence
LED_LIghtingCompany   7/15/2013 9:17:02 AM
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Brilliant Cabe! Totally agree with you.

 

LED Lighting Company

Gorski
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Platinum
Re: Electroluminescence
Gorski   2/16/2013 10:53:04 AM
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This looks like a winner. Making a softer light than LEDs or CFLs would get a majority of the female market. My wife's biggest complaint about non-incandescent lights are the harshness of their light. As they say, happy wife happy life

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: BETTER LIGHT BULB
Ann R. Thryft   1/28/2013 12:09:50 PM
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Your welcome, bobjengr. I agree about the 10-year lifespan. This is a prototype, and not at all close to being for sale, so there aren't any set specs yet--it would be great to find out more details.

bobjengr
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Platinum
BETTER LIGHT BULB
bobjengr   1/25/2013 6:18:00 PM
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 The very fact that it has lasted ten years is fantastic.  I'm use to screwing in a bulb and having it blow  due to voltage surges.   I went on the Wake Forest web site hoping to pull up specifications and none were there; i.e. watts, lumens, etc etc. This is a real breakthrough and certainly seems to be a viable alternative to what we have now in the market place. I think it is also gratifying to see nanotechnology applied to everyday uses.   Great Article Ann and thank you for the information. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Plastic illumination devices?
Ann R. Thryft   1/14/2013 11:47:50 AM
Scott, good point. I, too, hope that there aren't any hidden safety hazards associated with this new technology. Two things have disappointed me hugely about CFLs. First, the safety hazards associated with mercury, and second, the fact that they are meant to stay on for a long time, and not be switched on and off, as is usual in household, not office, use. That switching on and off lowers their lifespan tremendously. And of course, long lifespan was supposed to be part of the big draw in the first place--so you could amortize the much higher costs while you were saving energy.

Scott Orlosky
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Platinum
Re: Plastic illumination devices?
Scott Orlosky   1/13/2013 8:38:48 PM
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I'm not sure how much of the world's electricity budget goes to lighting - but I'll bet it's a lot.  If we can get our light for less energy, I'm all for it. Just as long as it doesn't pose a health hazard in the bargain (mercury in CFL's - I can't believe those are even allowed as a consumer item.)

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Plastic illumination devices?
Ann R. Thryft   1/10/2013 5:32:17 PM
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William, thanks for your comments. FIPEL (field-induced polymer electroluminescent) is the technology discussed here, invented by Carroll of Wake Forest U, the head of the research team mentioned in this article. Since FIPEL hasn't been commercialized yet, I suspect the EL you're talking about is not at all the same thing.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Electroluminescence
Cabe Atwell   1/10/2013 4:35:48 PM
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Seizure inducing frequencies are not pleasant at all. Take a trip to Target. Find some LED lights and plug them in. you will see what I mean.

I do like the idea of wireless xmas lights though...

C

RichardBradleySmith
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Silver
Re: Electroluminescence
RichardBradleySmith   1/10/2013 2:54:24 PM
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Seems like this would be a good application for Christmas lights. When I was taking the tree down the other day it I thought about the market for wireless lights. Wifi Christmas lights that clip on. Program them any way you like or download you favorite after seeing it on utube. Write messages on the tree in lights for arriving guests.

My wife was house sitting in Princeton NJ, big house, big tree, and she heard a creak. Yes, the tree fell over as she was looking at it. All that heavy wire...

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Electroluminescence
Ann R. Thryft   1/10/2013 2:02:13 PM
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mrdon, thanks for explaining why the flicker--and why it doesn't always happen. Blinking, or flickering, Christmas lights have been a tradition for ages.

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