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Materials & Assembly

3D Print Your Own Personal Electronics

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great article
Ann R. Thryft   2/12/2013 4:23:33 PM
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Thanks, Cadman, but I'm not in charge of the software for these boards. I suspect that would take a fair amount of recoding. Anyway, I don't mind writing someone's name at the beginning of my reply.

mrdon
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Gold
Re: Great article
mrdon   2/12/2013 11:39:01 AM
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Cadman-LT,  I'm just wondering what great innovations and applications will be developed this year for 3D-printers. I had a discussion with my Control Systems class last  Friday and explained that manufacturing is slowly coming back and 3D printing is the next evolution in this technology movement. Showed a Makerbot Replicator 2 video to connect the dots. They thought the video was pretty awesome.http://www.makerbot.com/

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Great article
Cadman-LT   2/12/2013 9:00:25 AM
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Here's a thought...lol...How about another reply button, but instead it says reply to poster? or something like that?

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Great article
Cadman-LT   2/12/2013 8:58:23 AM
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I guess it's because I just replied to an individual, but I forgot to include the name and what I said seems out of context. Just thinking there might be a better way.

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Great article
Cadman-LT   2/12/2013 8:55:27 AM
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Hey Ann! I was thinking that there might be a better or alternative way for the "reply". I think you should be able to reply to the article or discussion on hand as usual, but I also think that you should be able to reply to someone specifically without having to say it in your response. Just a thought. I think it might make things easier.

Cadman-LT
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Platinum
Re: Great article
Cadman-LT   2/12/2013 8:42:05 AM
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Yep, and it keeps getting better by the day! That technology is moving in leaps and bounds to say the least.

notarboca
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Gold
Re: The mind boggles
notarboca   1/31/2013 9:45:57 PM
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I believe that in 20 years, we will be 3D printing organs like the liver, pancreas, etc. I thought robotics would be transformative, and it is in biomechanical medical procedures, but 3D printing is certainly leading the pack.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Great article
Ann R. Thryft   1/2/2013 12:04:15 PM
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Good question, Chuck. I, too, had previously heard of conductive plastics used in flex circuits. This is the first time I've seen them combined with 3D printing. 3D printing isn't yet aimed at high volumes, but several efforts are underway to do just that, including this one we wrote about
http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1392&doc_id=248401

Scott Orlosky
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Platinum
Re: Future Implications
Scott Orlosky   12/30/2012 5:14:22 PM
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I'll bet we can look forward to all sorts of electronic hacks in the future with this techology. I can imagine future nerd clubs sharing files (and a 3D electronic printer) that you can interlink to build all sorts of stuff.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Future Implications
Ann R. Thryft   12/28/2012 12:00:08 PM
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Wow, Cabe, you weren't kidding! I remember hearing about MBE a while ago, but didn't realize it was a 3D printing method. Must be insanely expensive. I'd bet a lot of technology has been inspired by Star Trek shows.

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