HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test
Automakers Lay Foundation for Semi-Autonomous Driving
7/16/2012

Jeremy Salinger of GM: 'If you're not careful in the way you implement this technology, people will be less attentive to the road than they are now.'
Jeremy Salinger of GM: "If you're not careful in the way you implement this technology, people will be less attentive to the road than they are now."

Return to Article

View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/4  >  >>
Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Semi-automatic driving
Cabe Atwell   6/10/2014 2:42:24 AM
NO RATINGS
I remember watching Humvees driving by with nobody in them while working at Lockheed Martin's Colorado facility. Talk about autonomous but then again, they were probably driven remotely through RC as they were outfitted with an antenna array. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Semi-automatic driving
Charles Murray   8/28/2013 4:34:11 PM
NO RATINGS
High-end cars have some of those features today. Adaptive cruise control, lanekeeping and collision avoidance are gaining broader acceptance and winning the trust of vehicle owners, from what I hear.  

Gorski
User Rank
Platinum
Semi-automatic driving
Gorski   2/19/2013 3:55:28 PM
NO RATINGS
 

 

I think the idea of semi-automatic driving can be a good one if used properly. In traffic it would allow cars to be closer together with an automatic brake to maintain a safe distance according to vehicle speed. On long drives the driver could get more comfortable by not having to steer and be locked behind the wheel. The danger would be if the system is not foolproof people would br hurt andf lawyers would get richer.

 

Gorski PE

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What happens when it fails
Charles Murray   10/2/2012 5:31:54 PM
NO RATINGS
It's worth noting that California Governor Jerry Brown signed an autonomous vehicles bill into law last week, legalizing the testing of self-driving cars on the road in that state. The bill will set up procedures and requirements for determining when the cars are road-ready.

http://www.cnn.com/2012/09/25/tech/innovation/self-driving-car-california/index.html

david_banks1330
User Rank
Iron
Re: What happens when it fails
david_banks1330   9/28/2012 6:36:34 AM
NO RATINGS
the new technology for automakers are really getting very competitive. not just because they produce very high quality car parts but also because of their very high-end gadgets and technology installed in their cars. just can't wait to see what's next in line.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What happens when it fails
Charles Murray   8/10/2012 6:05:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Headhunter, you've cited a lot of good reasons here for automakers to consider full autonomy. As long as we have systems that can be overruled by dumb drivers, accidents will continue.

Headhunter
User Rank
Iron
Re: What happens when it fails
Headhunter   7/30/2012 8:37:04 PM
NO RATINGS
The point of tailgating is well understood, but with drivers being more competitive and less courteous and road sharing, the system cannot work. The system will brake every time someone cuts them off. The drivers behind you will get impatient and start taking risks with the overtaking cars in order to get around you.

 

So many people are so wrapped up in their tiny little lives that they don't recognize their actions as being sinister. They are nearly unaware of the hazards they face or that they produce. The decent driver can only drive to defend himself, continuously.

I think the DMV forgot about Franklin's rule: most people forget in 72 hrs. That includes driving rules and practices. Throw in a decade or so of impatience.

And you have America at it's best.

 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What happens when it fails
Charles Murray   7/24/2012 6:22:47 PM
NO RATINGS
To some degree, the technology you mentioned already exists, Scott. Adaptive cruise control would prevent tailgating (at least in some situations) and GM's Super Cruise would probably do it, too. The problem is that the tailgaters probably wouldn't use it.

Scott Orlosky
User Rank
Platinum
Re: What happens when it fails
Scott Orlosky   7/22/2012 7:12:40 PM
NO RATINGS
There has been a lot of work done in aviation to avoid collisions in 3D space.  I have to believe that the technological problem for cars has been pretty much solved and that issues of "personal freedom" and "control" are what limit the implementation.  Frankly I'd love to see a system that prevents "tailgating" become a mandatory part of the care just like air bags.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What happens when it fails
Ann R. Thryft   7/19/2012 2:07:46 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't agree with TJ that the analogy holds, because it doesn't structurally. And that's what analogies are about in order to work and to clarify thinking. I also don't agree with the idea that because people flout a law it's a bad law. I do agree with Bryan that the hands-free law makes the most sense, and that "I do not think we should make something legal just because a lot of people want to do it." Well said. Also well said about some cops' attitude to breaking the law.

Page 1/4  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Advertised as the "Most Powerful Tablet Under $100," the Kindle Fire HD 6 was too tempting for the team at iFixit to pass up. Join us to find out if inexpensive means cheap, irreparable, or just down right economical. It's teardown time!
The first photos made with a 3D-printed telescope are here and they're not as fuzzy as you might expect. A team from the University of Sheffield beat NASA to the goal. The photos of the Moon were made with a reflecting telescope that cost the research team 100 to make (about $161 US).
At Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, Joe Wascow told Design News how Optimal Design prototyped a machine that captures the wing-beat of a duck.
The increased adoption of wireless technology for mission-critical applications has revved up the global market for dynamic electronic general purpose (GP) test equipment. As the link between cloud networks and devices -- smartphones, tablets, and notebooks -- results in more complex devices under test, the demand for radio frequency test equipment is starting to intensify.
Much of the research on lithium-ion batteries is focused on how to make the batteries charge more quickly and last longer than they currently do, work that would significantly improve the experience of mobile device users, as well EV and hybrid car drivers. Researchers in Singapore have come up with what seems like the best solution so far -- a battery that can recharge itself in mere minutes and has a potential lifespan of 20 years.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service