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Electronics & Test
Golden Mousetrap Awards: The Winners!
2/13/2013

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Electronics & Test:
Components, Hardware & Interconnects
Analog Devices
AD9670 Octal Ultrasound Receiver
On July 23, 2012, Analog Devices Inc. introduced the industry's first octal (eight-channel) ultrasound receiver with on-chip digital I/Q demodulation and decimation filtering. Because of the embedded demodulation and decimation feature, ADI's AD9670 is the first ultrasound receiver able to condition eight channels of data from RF to a baseband frequency, reducing the processing load on the system FPGA (field-programmable gate array) by at least 50 percent compared to other receivers. The AD9670 also integrates a low-noise amplifier, variable gain amplifier, anti-aliasing filter, and a 14-bit, A/D converter with the industry's highest sample rate (125 MSPS) and best SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) performance (75 dB) for enhanced ultrasound image quality. The new octal receiver is the latest addition to Analog Devices' award-winning ultrasound receiver portfolio and is designed for mid- to high-end portable and cart-based ultrasound systems. 

By introducing the first octal ultrasound receiver with digital demodulation and decimation filtering, Analog Devices is able to minimize the data I/O and throughput rates and place less stress on the system processor. At the same time, by extending the anti-aliasing filter frequency range and maintaining a high A/D converter sample rate, we are continuing to help medical and industrial ultrasound equipment manufacturers meet the trend toward higher frequency probes and superior image quality.

Electronics & Test:

Components, Hardware & Interconnects

Analog Devices

AD9670 Octal Ultrasound Receiver

On July 23, 2012, Analog Devices Inc. introduced the industry’s first octal (eight-channel) ultrasound receiver with on-chip digital I/Q demodulation and decimation filtering. Because of the embedded demodulation and decimation feature, ADI’s AD9670 is the first ultrasound receiver able to condition eight channels of data from RF to a baseband frequency, reducing the processing load on the system FPGA (field-programmable gate array) by at least 50 percent compared to other receivers. The AD9670 also integrates a low-noise amplifier, variable gain amplifier, anti-aliasing filter, and a 14-bit, A/D converter with the industry’s highest sample rate (125 MSPS) and best SNR (signal-to-noise ratio) performance (75 dB) for enhanced ultrasound image quality. The new octal receiver is the latest addition to Analog Devices’ award-winning ultrasound receiver portfolio and is designed for mid- to high-end portable and cart-based ultrasound systems.

By introducing the first octal ultrasound receiver with digital demodulation and decimation filtering, Analog Devices is able to minimize the data I/O and throughput rates and place less stress on the system processor. At the same time, by extending the anti-aliasing filter frequency range and maintaining a high A/D converter sample rate, we are continuing to help medical and industrial ultrasound equipment manufacturers meet the trend toward higher frequency probes and superior image quality.

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morosem
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Christian McComas
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