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Mechatronics
Video: Robots Set to Explore Fukushima
11/9/2012

The Sakura, resembling a small tank, is designed to assess damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear reactor buildings, especially the basement areas. A key ability will be climbing stairs with changing slopes. (Source: Chiba Institute of Technology's Future Robotics Technology Center)
The Sakura, resembling a small tank, is designed to assess damage at the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear reactor buildings, especially the basement areas. A key ability will be climbing stairs with changing slopes.
(Source: Chiba Institute of Technology's Future Robotics Technology Center)

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naperlou
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Old tank
naperlou   11/9/2012 10:45:24 AM
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Ann, that's a WWI tank. 

Actually this is a good example of a very flexible robot.  In the Soviet Union they would just send people in.  At least here automation is being used to save lives.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Old tank
Ann R. Thryft   11/9/2012 12:14:21 PM
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Lou, I agree. I was surprised and delighted earlier this year to discover that a robot--iRobot's 510 PackBot--had been sent in after the accident and that this US robot was the first one to do so.

Charles Murray
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Re: Old tank
Charles Murray   11/9/2012 6:33:36 PM
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I agree, naperlou. I don't know what the radiation readings are inside the plant now, but better to send in a machine.

TJ McDermott
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Picking the worst of all possible worlds
TJ McDermott   11/12/2012 12:01:41 AM
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They're putting something called Cyberdyne HAL in harm's way?  I'm feeling safer already.

OK, that's out of my system.

Spacecraft manufacturers require radiation-hardened electronics for their spacecraft.  Are the robotics companies leveraging this technology?

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Picking the worst of all possible worlds
Ann R. Thryft   11/12/2012 11:53:41 AM
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TJ, don't you  just love those names? Lots of people have wondered if they're on purpose.
I had the same question about the use of existing rad-hard technology for space and military apps back when I heard about the first people and robots going into the plant post-disaster. One would think they're taking advantage of those!

TJ McDermott
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Re: Picking the worst of all possible worlds
TJ McDermott   11/12/2012 11:56:31 AM
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Oh, I think those names are intentional.  I believe putting them both on a single robot is overkill though.

William K.
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Robot to explore Fukushima, finally
William K.   11/12/2012 12:45:03 PM
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I am inclined to agree that the robot in the picture does look a bit like an older tank model. I am much more wondering why it has taken so very long to come up with such a creation. It does not look like there is an "breakthrough" design features, nor any wonderful new concepts. Of course the assurance of all of the materials being able to survive the possibly intense radiation may have taken some time. 

Do we know what effects radiation has on components such as rechargeable batteries? That may be a potential show stopper, since the alternative is to have the robot pay out a cable as it travels, and then some how recover the cable as it returns. That sort of feature would add weight and possibly reduce maneuverability, but it could extend mission times a whole lot. So robot power does become a show-changer, but not a show-stopping issue.

OF course, it may have taken that long to come up with the neat names.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Picking the worst of all possible worlds
Ann R. Thryft   11/12/2012 2:53:17 PM
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Actually, Cyberdyne is the company name and HAL is the robot's name. But you're right, using them both seems excessive.

Elizabeth M
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Great to see this kind of work being done
Elizabeth M   11/12/2012 3:07:48 PM
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I agree with you and the others, Ann, that it's great to see this kind of work being done. This is exactly the point of creating robots that can go places or perform tasks that are dangerous for humans. It's nice to see it being put to use in a real-world example, as a lot of this stuff is still in the concept phase.

Scott Orlosky
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Re: Great to see this kind of work being done
Scott Orlosky   11/18/2012 6:58:23 PM
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Elizabeth.  Right you are.  Wherever it is difficult or dangerous for people, our robots can step in. They are exploring Mars, the depths of the ocean even (gasp) the dust bunnies under the couch.  All kidding aside, let's hope that search and rescue bots are not far behind.

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