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Electronics & Test
Ford, GM Team Up on Transmissions
10/10/2012

General Motors currently builds eight-speed automatics at its assembly plant in Toledo, Ohio. The new agreement will enable them to build nine- and 10-speed transmissions.   (Source: General Motors)
General Motors currently builds eight-speed automatics at its assembly plant in Toledo, Ohio. The new agreement will enable them to build nine- and 10-speed transmissions.
(Source: General Motors)

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Charles Murray
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Re: GM's current eight-speed transmission
Charles Murray   10/11/2012 11:44:07 AM
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Ggarnier: Here's a follow-up to my comment above. GM's answer to your question about how the 8-speed will be used: "We have not yet announced what products will get the 8-speed, Toledo-built transmission."

Charles Murray
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Re: GM's current eight-speed transmission
Charles Murray   10/11/2012 11:07:58 AM
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GM's eight-speed transmissions are being developed for production vehicles, Ggarnier. The company invested $204 million in the Toledo plant where they're being built. As of now, I don't believe GM has said which vehicles will use the eight-speed, and when they will appear (we've e-mailed GM to double-check for you). Reports from various news organizations have speculated that the eight-speeds will be used full-sized pickups and SUVs, with possible launch in early 2013. My guess is we'll hear more about it at the Detroit Auto Show in January.

tekochip
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Re: Co-opetition at its finest?
tekochip   10/11/2012 11:07:00 AM
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I hear that the Ford CV transmission was dropped because of business concerns.  The transmission was expensive, it couldn't handle the torque of the newer engine that was planned, and people didn't like the way it behaved.  Drivers are used to a certain cadence of sounds and the CV doesn't produce the same sound and feel that people were comfortable with.
 
Just the same, I'm sure the top reason was the cost compared to the six-speed.


BigDipper
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Re: Co-opetition at its finest?
BigDipper   10/11/2012 10:16:21 AM
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naperlou,

Just about every hybrid being produced today has a CVT along with cars from Audi, Suburu, Nissan, and Mitsuibishi, to name a few more.  One plus for the CVT in slightly better fuel economy than with a "normal" automatic.

ChasChas
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Re: Co-opetition at its finest?
ChasChas   10/11/2012 10:03:28 AM
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naperlou, my 2007 Ford Five Hundred has a continuously varible transmission. It's here already. Does anyone know why was it was discontinued? 

Ggarnier
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GM's current eight-speed transmission
Ggarnier   10/11/2012 9:51:12 AM
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"GM has been building eight-speed automatic transmissions at its assembly plant in Toldeo, Ohio, but none of those transmissions are yet offered in current vehicles."

Is this pilot production for development and test purposes? If not, where are these transmissions going?

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Other ramifications
Beth Stackpole   10/11/2012 7:03:25 AM
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@TJ: Still think it's necessary since there is no way there will be a singular shift to pure electric even with stable and formidible battery technology. There definitely still needs to be choice and this type of intra-industry sharing of R&D makes perfect sense in terms of bettering the choices.

Beth Stackpole
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Re: Other ramifications
Beth Stackpole   10/11/2012 7:01:53 AM
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@TJ: Still think it's necessary since there is no way there will be a singular shift to pure electric even with stable and formidible battery technology. There definitely still needs to be choice and this type of intra-industry sharing of R&D makes perfect sense in terms of bettering the choices.

TJ McDermott
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Other ramifications
TJ McDermott   10/11/2012 12:59:33 AM
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A higher speed count means better mileage - ok, I save some money on gas.  What other cost ramifications will impact us?  How much more will the transmissions cost - how much will they add to the sticker price?

How much more likely will they be to fail, and what cost to repair?

If we can get to all-electric vehicles (darn battery storage!) then this wouldn't be necessary; variable frequency drives give the infinitely adjustable speed control.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Co-opetition at its finest?
Rob Spiegel   10/10/2012 6:15:49 PM
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You're right, Chuck, there is a long history of automakers sharing technology developments. Automakers also share lobbying efforts. While it may seem odd -- or collusive -- for competitors to share development, well, they are under some heavy pressure to deliver the CAFE standards they're facing. I would imagine the government would be supportive of this type of sharing, since it is directly related to heavy government demands.

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