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Automation & Control

The Evolution of Packaging Controls

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apresher
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Progress on Standardizing Machine User Interfaces
apresher   1/3/2013 10:54:07 AM
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We can expect more progress on this topic in 2013. Even though the concept of standardizing machine user interfaces seems straightforward and easy, it really is an area that defies standardization. Especially in a packaging line, individual cells and operations have distinctly different needs. So it will be interesting to keep an eye on the work of the OMAC Packaging Workgroup this year.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Rob Spiegel   9/14/2012 1:29:40 PM
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The overlap between these two trends -- baby boomer retirement and lower-skilled operators taking over plant functions -- may be opportunisitic. If the baby boomers are retiring, it's a good time to switch from an engineer to an operator.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Evolution of Packaging Controls
Ann R. Thryft   9/12/2012 3:51:56 PM
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Al, that was my understanding, that better trained, and costlier, engineers were being replaced gradually by less technical operators, regardless of age.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Ann R. Thryft   9/12/2012 11:56:11 AM
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Well, I wouldn't be surprised if there's some overlap between these trends, but my understanding is the same as yours, that they are independent.

apresher
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Evolution of Packaging Controls
apresher   9/11/2012 3:49:02 PM
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Ann,  I think the trend here is younger, less technically educated operators rather than engineers being replaced by younger engineers. With the level of automation in some plants, even fewer operators are required.  This movement is toward integrating training resources (ready access to documentation, training videos and more) from the HMI itself.  That enables more self-teaching, and innovative use of machine animations which can "show" how to perform a maintenance task, for example, versus reading a series of steps.  This type of animation using 3D models is still expensive to develop but doesn't seem beyond reach in the not-too-distant future.  Some automation vendors are moving in this direction but getting photo-realistics 3D animation is still in the future. Great to see how things are moving ahead in this area.

apresher
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Evolution of Packaging Controls
apresher   9/11/2012 3:43:35 PM
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The new thing here is the standardization of HMIs screens to a common look and feel. OEM machinery builders, apart from the packaging industry, might resist this just because the operator interface is a clear part of the value added of the machine.  It will be interesting to see how widely this is adopted, especially adding the functionality of changing system parameters directly from the HMI (versus using the automation vendor's computer tools).  Overall, the operator interface is going through a significant transformation with lower cost, much more capable hardware and now also touchscreens joining in.  Should be interesting to see how it develops toward becoming more of a "Dashboard" for machines.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Rob Spiegel   9/11/2012 1:09:31 PM
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Yes, Ann, I was under the impression the shift from baby boomers to younger workers is still within the community of engineering. But maybe not. Maybe they're replacing the boomer engineers with non-engineers. I would make an interesting article.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Ann R. Thryft   9/11/2012 1:04:53 PM
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Interesting, Rob. I hadn't connected the dots between the baby boomer retiring trend and younger workers with the cost-cutting trend of using less expensive operators instead of engineers on the factory floor. I'm not sure they're the same thing. First, the engineer vs operator trend is usually described as being due to improved HMI, as we were originally discussing. Plus, isn't the first trend occurring mostly within engineering?

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Rob Spiegel   9/11/2012 12:52:27 PM
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I guess that shouldn't be surprising, Ann. This could be part of the trend of replacing the baby-boomer engineers at plants. As the boomers retire, I hear they are being replaced by younger workers who have less automation and control experience, but more computer experience, which is mostly appropriate given the changing nature of automation. And of course they would be lower-cost workers simply because of their youth and inexperience. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Standards seem to be a must here
Ann R. Thryft   9/11/2012 12:18:19 PM
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The decision-making can shift to lower-cost operators because they're making fewer decisions--and more low-level ones--as more functions get automated. This is by no means the case everywhere, but it's yet another cost-cutting trend. That's what I've heard, anyway.

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