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Materials & Assembly

Slideshow: 3D Printing Final Airplane Parts

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Cabe Atwell
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Re: Big news
Cabe Atwell   5/4/2014 11:14:58 PM
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@ a2: Indeed, NASA is doing just that, with testing 3D printed fuel injectors and other parts for rocket motors. The parts are still undergoing testing for feasibility before actually being implemented.

Ann R. Thryft
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Ann R. Thryft   3/31/2014 11:06:46 AM
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Nadine, that's an interesting question. But I don't think commercial airlines have to sell this idea to the general public, any more than they had to sell replacing metal parts with plastic to the general public several years ago--which they didn't AFAIK. It's a highly regulated industry, so the only sales job is to the FAA and similar regulators.

Ann R. Thryft
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Ann R. Thryft   3/31/2014 11:06:14 AM
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You're welcome Pubudu.




Elizabeth M
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Elizabeth M   3/31/2014 6:21:11 AM
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Thanks for the info, a2. That sounds like a sound plan.

a2
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a2   3/31/2014 5:32:49 AM
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@Elizabeth: IMO 3D printing has to be tested for few more years to identify the real value of it. Without assessing I don't think we can measure what the capabilities of it. Give it some time and then things will work well.   

a2
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a2   3/31/2014 5:32:49 AM
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@Elizabeth: IMO 3D printing has to be tested for few more years to identify the real value of it. Without assessing I don't think we can measure what the capabilities of it. Give it some time and then things will work well.   

Elizabeth M
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Elizabeth M   3/31/2014 5:13:38 AM
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Interesting perspective, NadineJ. The public's perception of 3D printing definitely comes into play when you're talking about something like airplanes. I would hope people would understand these parts would be as safe and effective as traditionally manufactured parts, but it might not be a bad idea to break them in slowly with the parts you're suggesting until people have a better understanding of 3D printing.

a.saji
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Re: Big news
a.saji   3/30/2014 11:23:56 PM
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@Pubudu: 3D printing is on and when it came in to play it was quite hard to believe but right now there are many proofs. So let's hope it will be used for good things and many more new things will be embedded to it in the near future. 

NadineJ
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NadineJ   3/30/2014 6:53:30 PM
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I agree with everyone that this is very interesting.

I wonder how airlines will sell this idea to the general public.  Many people don't understand the beginnings of 3D printing.  The advancements made in the last few years are like science fiction for some. 

If people knew that integral parts of the airplane were 3D printed, would they get on board?  Should we start with bathroom door handles and remote controls to help people become more comfortable?

Pubudu
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Re: Big news
Pubudu   3/30/2014 1:07:01 PM
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Ann many thanks for sharing these info
Yes Elizabeht, this is heard to believe for me also. I believe that this will ensure the usability of a 3D printing industry.

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