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Mechatronics

Guardbot Rolls Into Position

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Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
clever use of center of gravity
Nancy Golden   2/27/2014 9:26:27 PM
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"The patented drive-mechanism uses a motorized pendulum to propel the Guardbot by changing the center of gravity for back-and-forth movement, as well as 360-degree turns" sounds like an ingenious way to take advantage of a sphere's capability for directional momentum. It reminds me of a hamster ball with a hamster in it - the hamster's center of gravity affecting the ball's motion and direction while moving about the floor. I am wondering if any of these are in service yet - the variety of payloads make the extremely versatile and I could see them being used in many different applications.

rossloeb
User Rank
Iron
Guardbot
rossloeb   2/28/2014 8:29:53 AM
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But can it climb stairs?

tdesmit
User Rank
Silver
Re: Guardbot
tdesmit   2/28/2014 9:06:50 AM
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Doesn't look like it could climb stairs, but decending them would be a breeze! Whether or not it would still function when it reached the bottom is another question....

Tom D.

VadimR
User Rank
Gold
large version 9ft tall?
VadimR   2/28/2014 9:21:45 AM
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The 9ft tall version would be interesting to see.  That could accomodate a human pilot.

I assume the motor torque ratings are given in Newton meter (Nm) and not nanometer (nm).

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Interesting device, but simple to disable.
William K.   2/28/2014 10:15:38 AM
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This is an interesting alternative arrangement for a security patrol device, and it would appear to have avoided quite a few of the common challenges with it's unique form factor. But it would be fairly simple to neutralize with a method similar to the one used by biologists for capturing skunks. But otherwise it is quite an intersting package. A smaller version would probably sell very well as a high-class toy. Just think, a two inch model could probably go almost anywhere and not be noticed. But scaling down might be quite a challenge. 

btwolfe
User Rank
Gold
Re: Interesting device, but simple to disable.
btwolfe   2/28/2014 10:37:30 AM
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I don't see how the drive mechanism is any different than a Sphero toy, but I like the dual gimballed camera mechanism. I assume the cameras are independently controllable in pan and tilt, like a chameleon? If you could point them in the same direction, you could probably get reasonable stereo vision to a remote operator.

SherpaDoug
User Rank
Gold
A Rotundus derivative?
SherpaDoug   2/28/2014 10:53:21 AM
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This looks a lot like a copy of the Rotundus machine from a few years ago: http://www.rotundus.se/

IIRC the major problems with Rotundus were heat buildup in the non-vented housing, and keeping the camera domes clean and unscratched.

Cabe Atwell
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A Rotundus derivative?
Cabe Atwell   3/26/2014 4:41:09 PM
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What's to prevent criminals from simply kicking the GuardBot like a soccer ball off into the distance? I mean really, it's like securing a gate with a twist-tie. 

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Droid
Greg M. Jung   6/30/2014 11:13:25 PM
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Looks like a droid from Star Wars. I'll bet its fairly good at traveling over mud too.

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