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Mechatronics

Bionic Man Shows What’s Humanly Possible With Artificial Medical Technology

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Impressive project and progress
Ann R. Thryft   1/3/2014 1:07:01 PM
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Thanks, etmax, you stated my question more clearly than I did :) It was based on the previous, failed attempts at interfacing biological elements (nerves, muscles, etc) to electronic ones due to chemical poisoning from metals. In medical materials R&D, there's been a ton of work to identify materials that can be implanted, but most of those are plastics. Titanium is the exception, but as you point out, it's used to bond with bone, not nerves.

Elizabeth M
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Re: impressive but questions
Elizabeth M   1/2/2014 10:10:42 AM
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Also, AnandY, thank you for the compliment on the story! (I forgot to say that in my previous comment.) It was a great deal of fun to write and research. I found it fascinating and am glad you did, too.

Elizabeth M
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Re: impressive but questions
Elizabeth M   1/2/2014 10:08:47 AM
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Hi, AnandY. I can answer the artificial heart question at least. It was connected to an artificial circulatory system that did indeed pump blood throughout the robot to show how it can be done. So while it didn't matter to the robot's "life" per se, it did show how it could be done artificially.

notarboca
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Re: impressive but questions
notarboca   12/31/2013 9:29:01 PM
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AnandY--it would be interesting to know which systems are controlled together, or if, as you suggest, the artificial parts are just hung on a robot skeleton.

AnandY
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Re: impressive but questions
AnandY   12/30/2013 7:53:34 AM
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@Elizabeth, this is a great piece but one that leaves me with so many questions (a few of which am hoping someone here will answer). For starters, I know the artificial heart can't pump blood into the robot so what is it really doing there? Or is the robot just meant to be a stand on which to hang all the prosthetics and artificial body parts has been able to create without necessarily having these parts communicate or work together. And, any ideas about the artificial intelligence, however minor, included in the whole piece?

AnandY
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Re: Impressive project and progress
AnandY   12/30/2013 7:29:33 AM
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This is impressive, not because the team was able to collect all the prosthetic and artificial limbs that are already functionally being used in different parts of the world but because the team was actually able to make these parts actually work together as they would in a human body. More importantly, it provides a clear blue print of what needs to be done now in order to come up with a complete and functional bionic man.

etmax
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Re: Impressive project and progress
etmax   12/26/2013 10:05:47 PM
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No always FRED when it's a Flaming Ridiculous Electronic Device :-)

William K.
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Re: The project is indeed very impressive.
William K.   12/26/2013 9:49:14 PM
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etmax, yes, the degree of non-thinking that we see is probably going toleadto a really big disaster in the future. With the cop-out phrase of "I didn't know", which is one excuse that I don't accept any more. My reply is that when does not know, one must find out, or do something else.

Greg M. Jung
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Re: Impressive project and progress
Greg M. Jung   12/26/2013 9:41:00 PM
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@William K and @etmax, thanks for the update.  Seems that nerve cells are much more sensitive than bone cells (would higher bio-electricity levels through nerves be one of the critical factors that causes this characteristic?)

etmax
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Re: The project is indeed very impressive.
etmax   12/26/2013 8:47:58 PM
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WilliamK, I read an article about 6 years ago where some researchers were studying E.Coli and why it was so fragile outside the body and decideded it was due to dehydration so they transplanted some genes from an extremophile and had E.Coli that could survive anywhere. To me that was total lunacy, if it ever got out of the lab it would be a disaster.

I know they say that can't happen but we have a high security biolab nearby that does research into various pathogens to create vaccines and treatments and they were working on some chicken flu. To cut a long story short there was an accident and worker worker got infected with a non-lethal (to humans) version and was sent home and that weekend she visited family who have a large chicken farm. Nothing happened but it was so close to going awry. People are simply fallable and as a result shouldn't be allowed to do certain things.

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