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Teardown: Inside Apple's iPad Air

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Rob Spiegel
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Quite a detailed teardown
Rob Spiegel   11/4/2013 8:09:22 AM
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Nice tear down. As usual, the iPad has a ton of electronics in a very small, flat space. It sill surprises me that heat is not a major problem.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Elizabeth M   11/4/2013 8:29:24 AM
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I agree, yet another fascinating look into another Apple gadget. The point about having all the electronics in a small space is a good one, Rob. It completely explains the heat issues Apple has had with its devices and notebook computers.

Charles Murray
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Charles Murray   11/4/2013 6:12:10 PM
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Agree, Rob. We've come a long way from our early PCs, many of which had cooling fans.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Rob Spiegel   11/5/2013 5:57:54 AM
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That's right, Chuck. Even my first Mac laptop had a cooling fan. That was 1995. It had an impressive -- at the time -- hard drive of 500k. List price: $2,800.

Battar
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Battar   11/5/2013 9:09:16 AM
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"Spring contacts on the logic board clamp down on the corresponding tab on the battery"

Does this suggest that the battery serves as an auxilliary heatsink for the board ?

Jim_E
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Great pun
Jim_E   11/5/2013 9:45:54 AM
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As a jokester, I had to appreciate this line:

" This battery is super frustrating; we're not Li-ion."

Nice!

Elizabeth M
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Elizabeth M   11/5/2013 10:17:25 AM
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Oh my gosh, hearing about those old laptops really brings me back in time. I never had any of the early ones, but what dinosaurs they seem like now. Cooling fans...lol!

tekochip
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Disposable?
tekochip   11/5/2013 11:48:54 AM
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First, a truly excellent tear down, and I'm not Li-ion (seriously?).
 
A few thoughts, though; I can't believe that so much of the device is glued together.  Talk about fostering a disposal society, which means long lines for the next version.  When the batteries fail this thing will end up in a landfill and that seems like some sort of punishable offense.  I suppose in some communities it is.
 
I see that the touch screen is not optically bonded to the display and I'm really impressed by the performance of the complete display package, considering that the two components just sit on top of each other.


Charles Murray
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Re: Disposable?
Charles Murray   11/5/2013 7:43:24 PM
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I agree about the disposal issues, tekochip. I have a feeling there are already millions of people with old electronics in their basements that they don't know what to do with because they don't know how to deal with the disposal issues. Designs like this will make it worse.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Quite a detailed teardown
Rob Spiegel   11/6/2013 7:06:50 AM
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They were really bad, Elizabeth. If I used my laptop too long, I would have to prop up the front of the laptop in order for more air to get to the fan. Otherwise it would freeze.

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