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Materials & Assembly

Slippery Material System Can Start, Stop Liquids

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Scott Orlosky
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Re: Stop-Go
Scott Orlosky   4/30/2013 10:50:25 PM
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Hmm.  Seems like a bit of a stretch to me.  The eyelid is a mechanical liquid dispersal system, it's not changing the physical surface of the eyeball in order to change the flow of liquid. Still, it's a unique bit of research and sometimes these find valuable uses down the line.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Stop-Go
Ann R. Thryft   5/1/2013 12:28:52 PM
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I thought it was a stretch, too, and for the same reasons--not really an analogy--which is why I didn't include that info in the article.

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Stop-Go
Cabe Atwell   6/27/2013 11:16:09 PM
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It would seem the material could be adapted for use in shoes as a better means of traction when traversing on inclines. More pressure on the down step could potentially stretch the material giving it better grip.

C

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Stop-Go
Ann R. Thryft   6/28/2013 11:46:40 AM
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Cabe, that's another clever observation: sounds like an intriguing application for this material, assuming it has enough adhesion to take all that weight (instead of just the weight of the liquid). If it does, hiking boots would be a good app. I've scrambled down too many scree-filled hillsides, managing to not fall over by walking like a crab and using a stick. Better gripping shoes would have helped.

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