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Design Hardware & Software

There’s No Excuse for Not Designing Virtually

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Cabe Atwell
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Go virtual or go home
Cabe Atwell   4/5/2013 3:13:47 AM
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This article opened me up to Labview a little bit more. I plan on integrating more virtual test in some products I am working on at the moment.

I either empirically test a valve for months, or I get test data and make analytical assumptions.

Seems like an obvious choice, no?

C

Nancy Golden
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Re: Go virtual or go home
Nancy Golden   4/21/2013 11:04:14 PM
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Test and measurement software such as Labview is a great solution - it eliminates the need to do low level programming and once you become conversant in it - you can achieve a lot in a small amount of time. Back in the day I did a lot of IEEE (GPIB) programming as a Certified Testpoint Application Specialist - I was a test engineer for a semiconductor company. Being able to write programs that allowed remote data monitoring was huge back then and invaluable today.

apresher
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Designing Virtually
apresher   4/5/2013 9:29:55 AM
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This is a trend where we should see very strong growth. The ability to create virtual interfaces for monitoring almost any aspect of machine performance is getting easier with new tools. Thanks for the article.  Excellent.

tekochip
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Edison and Haystack
tekochip   4/5/2013 10:25:17 AM
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The opening paragraph reminds me of what Tesla said about Edison;
 
If Edison had a needle to find in a haystack, he would proceed at once with the diligence of the bee to examine straw after straw until he found the object of his search... I was a sorry witness of such doings, knowing that a little theory and calculation would have saved him ninety per cent of his labor.
 


Greg M. Jung
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Re: Edison and Haystack
Greg M. Jung   4/6/2013 2:19:00 PM
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I agree.  Today's lean product development environment must be as efficient as possible in order to quickly get quality products to market on time and on cost.  Basic theoy is the foundational starting point of good design.

On the filp side, unintended failure modes in these user interfaces could be present, so thorough user validation testing should be performed before release.

ttemple
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Re: Edison and Haystack
ttemple   4/22/2013 12:59:08 PM
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I just saw some old movie with a good line.  It went something like "It's easy to find a needle in a haystack.  Get a horse eat the hay, then x-ray the horse."

Cabe Atwell
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Re: Edison and Haystack
Cabe Atwell   4/22/2013 5:35:41 PM
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Needle in a haystack... giant magnet. Bam!

 

Labview can relay your data acquisition to tablets and phone easily. This one feature is worth a look at...

C

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