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Materials & Assembly

Plastic Makes a Better Light Bulb

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mrdon
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Gold
Re: Electroluminescence
mrdon   1/8/2013 1:18:01 PM
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Hi Ann, Oh, great. I read more into the technology via the article as well as check if FIPEL technology is considered a SSL device.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Electroluminescence
Charles Murray   1/8/2013 7:14:55 PM
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Ann, the fact that Carroll has been developing the technology for ten years makes me wonder: What's been the big technological hurdle in all that time?

Mydesign
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Platinum
Plastic adaptable
Mydesign   1/9/2013 5:06:04 AM
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1 saves
Ann, it seems that usage of plastic is increasing in various forms across different domains. Some of the good qualities of plastics like resistance to corrosion, low electric & thermal conductivity, durability etc can make them more adaptable and suitable for such missions.

Jim_E
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Skepticism
Jim_E   1/9/2013 10:09:42 AM
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It looks like we're not the only ones who seem a bit skeptical about the announcement:

http://arstechnica.com/science/2012/12/fipel-wonder-light-where-are-the-numbers/

ARS Technica apparently asked for specific performance numbers and didn't get them.

I'm quite interested in what might come out of this work, but would honestly be surprised if it gets to market as fast as they say....

 

 

TommyH
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Silver
How bright are these things
TommyH   1/9/2013 10:40:14 AM
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It is interesting that rather than talk about candle power, the devices are described as less harsh than LED or florescent lights.   A candle meets those criteria as well as a match,  a glowing ember etc.  Can anyone put this into terms of candle power per watt or some other real world measurement?

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Electroluminescence
Ann R. Thryft   1/9/2013 11:54:15 AM
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There seems to be some confusion here regarding the difference between prototypes and working products, and the amount of time it requires to move from the first to the second. I made an earlier comment on this subject: "Maybe we're all used to Silicon Valley-style announcements of new technology for sale right now in high volumes, and not of the long R&D cycle behind that technology. In materials technology, especially energy-related, development can take a long time...The main researcher has had a single working device for a long time--but not a bulb, and, presumably, a very expensive device, and, I'd guess, one he's been tinkering with as a prototype."

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Skepticism
Ann R. Thryft   1/9/2013 11:55:09 AM
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I'm betting the reason ARS Technica didn't get "performance numbers" is because they asked the wrong question. So far, AFAIK, this is a number of prototype devices, not a single actual bulb with wattage specs, which is what will be produced after commercialization efforts are completed. The details that are available can be found in the (free) journal article, which we provide a link to. They include varying luminance intensities.

William K.
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Platinum
Plastic illumination devices?
William K.   1/9/2013 12:27:34 PM
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It looks like this may possibly be a breakthrough, or possibly not. I remeber the electro-luminescent panels and devices that we had in the 1960's and wonder if it is a new implemantation of that technology. Those devices did provide a nice grale-free light, but not that much of it. I have no ideas about the relative efficiency, or lumens per watt. But the devices were very long-lived. I think that they were sort of expensive, as well. I have a couple of the inverter packages that were used by Chrysler for the EL instrument panels back in 1965, I think. They put out a very spikey waveform with a peak of almost 200V. 

It would be interesting to find out about the performance of an actual prototype, as opposed to that of a single research sample device. That is the sort of information that would help to understand where this technology lies, on the development toward commercialization curve.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: How bright are these things
Ann R. Thryft   1/9/2013 12:38:44 PM
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TommyH, I think you meant candela, not candle power. The latter is considered an obsolete unit of measurement. Today, this is measured via luminance or luminous intensity. Wikipedia has a good article on luminance.

TommyH
User Rank
Silver
Re: How bright are these things
TommyH   1/9/2013 1:34:30 PM
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I guess the jig is up.  Everyone now knows that I am getting sort of long in the tooth. 

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