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Electronics & Test

Engineers 'Hone' In on Solution for Tiny V-8 Engine

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KenL
User Rank
Gold
"Hone In"
KenL   9/28/2012 1:18:35 PM
The correct grammar is "Home In", but I realize that you are using "Hone In" as a pun, relating to the cylinder honing. 

Xjandin
User Rank
Silver
Awesome!
Xjandin   9/28/2012 2:14:54 PM
NO RATINGS
This is TOTALLY AWESOME! Engineering at it's best. Find a difficult challenge and then find an innovative solution. The idea of putting valleys on the cylinder walls is genious. I wouldn't have thought that the molecular size of oil would matter or that oil would be the limiting factor.

WELL DONE!

As for the detractors, time to start living again and seeing the beauty in the world around us and the fun and excitement of exploration. I have no doubt that this innovative design will be used in many more 'lubrication intensive' designs.

 

Island_Al
User Rank
Gold
Re: Awesome!
Island_Al   9/28/2012 2:51:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Ditto that Xjandin. I thank the Thor daily that RF scales down nicely. Forget what the naysayers think.  Another 'for what purpose' is I had a Vette that would do 120mph and live in an area where the max speed limit is 55mph. For what purpose? No purpose, I just loved a car that would slam me into the seat from a dead stop. Today I drive a 'mild' Mustang GT convertible.  Old age is setting in.

But his engine is indeed awesome. An engineering WOW.

 

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Awesome!
Dave Palmer   9/28/2012 2:54:38 PM
NO RATINGS
@Xjandin: I think nearly everyone agrees that a working V8 engine on this scale is an exciting development.  But as for putting valleys on the cylinder liners, that's nothing new.  Plateau honing has been around pretty much forever.  It's not quite clear from the article what's new about the honing (other than the scale).

Xjandin
User Rank
Silver
Re: Awesome!
Xjandin   9/28/2012 3:59:40 PM
Yeah, I'm computer/electrical engineering, so this might be well known and not innovative (although at one point it was innovative). Even so, I still think it's better to be excited than dismissive.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Awesome!
Dave Palmer   9/28/2012 4:30:12 PM
@Xjandin: I agree.  To paraphrase Dale Carnegie, "Any fool can be dismissive of others' work, and most fools are."

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Awesome!
Charles Murray   9/28/2012 5:27:49 PM
NO RATINGS
You're right, Dave. As far as the honing goes, the scale is the only new aspect. Conley discussed the honing of the cylinder liner because he highlighted the engine at the machine tool show.

notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Awesome!
notarboca   9/29/2012 1:25:48 AM
NO RATINGS
Very cool accomplishment.  I would not have suspected the oil would be the issue as far as scaling.  Great machining capability!

Scott Orlosky
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Awesome!
Scott Orlosky   9/29/2012 2:09:48 PM
NO RATINGS
I have to agree with the general tone of most responses that this is an amazing engineering achievement. A supercharged V-8 is already loaded with engineering innovation. To shrink that down to 1/4 size, I'm sure Mr. Conley had to solve more problems than just this oil retention issue.  With national mandates to improve passenger car mpg, this development may not seem quite so out of the mainstream a few years from now.

mcj084
User Rank
Iron
Re: Awesome!
mcj084   9/30/2012 9:21:35 PM
NO RATINGS
It is quite an accomplishment and praiseworthy indeed. However, developing 13hp is a far cry more down-sized than the 1/4 size scale of the engine. One would expect a great deal more than 130hp from a full-sized super-charged V8. It appears that the power-to weight ratio doesn't scale very well.

Kudos for overcoming the difficulties and achieving this amazing engine.

 

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