HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

Tin Whiskers Again Cited as Potential Problem for Toyotas

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 5/6  >  >>
robatnorcross
User Rank
Gold
Re: Bring lead back to electronics.
robatnorcross   7/26/2012 8:58:47 PM
"Several Years" doesn't quite cut it. Many military systems have to last for decades and have life or death consequences. Military systems must also endure really "bad" environments i.e. salt water, jungle humidity and heat among others.

I find it ironic that Grassley and his cohorts pretend to know about EVERYTHING. They allow Brussels (the EU) to dictate what the world does and then get all upset when things go to hell. They then start demanding explanations from people that they forced to comply to their previous bad decisions.

Chris PE
User Rank
Gold
We all make mistakes
Chris PE   7/27/2012 9:24:29 AM
We all make mistakes.ROHS was one of them. It cost billions of dollars in losses, equipment and defective products.As for military , I cannot give the name of a document, but in April this year all of military products have been taken off the ROHS requirement. There may be some electro - mechanical assemblies of high power  ,that still "linger" , but are on the way out.Car batteries are the highest concentration of lead in the environment, so stupid solder on PC board does not even matter.Needle in a stack! We all have to be realistic about this and Toyota cover-up was just a lie.

Tom Drechsler
User Rank
Silver
Re: We all make mistakes
Tom Drechsler   7/27/2012 11:29:32 AM
If the recylcing rate on consumer electronics approached that of car batteries, none of this would be necessary. All we have to do is implement a $15 core charge on every consumer electronics item, maybe $150 on every commercial electronics good. Instead, we ship it all to Nigeria ( or China or Vietnam) & let them extract the metals.

oldbikefixr
User Rank
Silver
Re: Bring lead back to electronics.
oldbikefixr   7/27/2012 5:37:59 PM
BigEd....lead was added to tin solder in the early 1900's to prevent the formation of tin whiskers.

Leaded solder connections do corrode when exposed to active elements, but that is not the same as tin whiskers. This corrosion can be reduced/prevented with the use of conformal coatings.

Tests with lead content vs whisker formation indicates that as little as 3% lead will prevent the formation of tin whiskers.

 

Chris PE
User Rank
Gold
Re: Bring lead back to electronics.
Chris PE   7/31/2012 4:05:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Exactly!

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Bring lead back to electronics.
Rob Spiegel   7/31/2012 7:26:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Thyat's right, Oldbikefixr. And many argue that the 3 percent lead in the tin will not leach out into ground water at landfills. 

jmiller
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tin Whisker Headaches
jmiller   7/31/2012 8:46:08 PM
NO RATINGS
Good question.  Also, why not have some duplicate feedback for some critical systems?

wbswenberg
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Tin Whisker Headaches
wbswenberg   8/7/2012 3:09:21 PM
NO RATINGS
In aerospace tin plate wire is a nono except for test equipment.  I believe the wiskers will grow right through the insulation.  So much for coating.

averagejoe72677
User Rank
Gold
Re: Tin Whisker Headaches
averagejoe72677   8/7/2012 3:58:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Unless the electronics industry has a secret planned obsolence policy (would not surprise me), and ROHLS was not intended for the electronics industry (as others stated) why hang on to a lemon policy of continuing to use lead free solder? 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More information
Charles Murray   8/8/2012 7:08:12 PM
NO RATINGS
 I agree, tekochip. Seems to me that NHTSA did its homework.

<<  <  Page 5/6  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's Galaxy line of smartphones used to fare quite well in the repairability department, but last year's flagship S5 model took a tumble, scoring a meh-inducing 5/10. Will the newly redesigned S6 lead us back into star-studded territory, or will we sink further into the depths of a repairability black hole?
Fifteen European research centers have launched EuroCPS to help European companies develop innovative products for the Internet of Things.
Get your Allman Brothers albums ready. The iconic Volkswagen Microbus may be poised for a comeback, and this time it could be electric.
In 2003, the world contained just over 500 million Internet-connected devices. By 2010, this figure had risen to 12.5 billion connected objects, almost six devices per individual with access to the Internet. Now, as we move into 2015, the number of connected 'things' is expected to reach 25 billion, ultimately edging toward 50 billion by the end of the decade.
NASA engineer Brian Trease studied abroad in Japan as a high school student and used to fold fast-food wrappers into cranes using origami techniques he learned in library books. Inspired by this, he began to imagine that origami could be applied to building spacecraft components, particularly solar panels that could one day send solar power from space to be used on earth.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service