HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

MEMS Sensors Bring Intelligence to Tennis Rackets

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
notarboca
User Rank
Gold
Re: Not so sure...
notarboca   11/20/2013 9:23:52 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Jack.  The racket will produce and send a lot of info in real time, but to really get the maximum benefit, a human analyst must convert this to useful intelligence for the player.

freisl
User Rank
Iron
Re: Pretty sure...
freisl   2/7/2013 7:59:57 AM
NO RATINGS
Real time data presentation and interpretation is key.

How about having a practice mode that lights up the srting lattice to immediately display the placement, force and spin? The placement, color and shape(eccentricity) of the impact region string display could do this almost instantly.

If you have your eyes on the ball, you can pick up this feedback with little or no distraction, Later your coaching video can be analysed along with your bodykinematics to see the effect of the strike on the racquet and the ball trajectory, without the need to analyse graphs for every impact.

It might even speed up the process of beginners learning the "feel" of the racquet.

Is there such a thing as too much information?

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Not so sure...
Charles Murray   7/25/2012 7:53:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Definitely true, Jack. This is not the kind of technology that provides a lot of real time benefits. You need to be willing to use this technology to gather information, and then go over the results at a later time.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not so sure...
Jack Rupert, PE   6/24/2012 2:47:01 PM
NO RATINGS
I would think that this would work as part of a coaching suite of devices, not for an individual - similar to some of the swing analyzers available to dedicated golfers.  Probably not a stand-alone application, but something combined with video, an analyzis system, and a person who really knows what it all means.

bobjengr
User Rank
Platinum
TENNIS
bobjengr   6/15/2012 5:34:42 PM
NO RATINGS

 I can see other possibilities for the technology and think this has significant application for describing kinetic movement.     As a matter of fact Charles, you have given me an idea for the possible solution to a "nagging" problem involving the destruction of a motion sensor in a diesel "big rig".   I intend to contact the company involved with the technology and start the process of "discovery".   Who knows, the great sport of tennis may not be the only application.  Many thanks and well done. 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Intelligence to Tennis Rackets
Ann R. Thryft   6/14/2012 11:41:36 AM
NO RATINGS
I discovered commercial motion capture devices recently when writing about robot gesture recognition experiments. The material is a sensor tape containing a 3D bend-and-twist sensor based on fiber optics, which can be custom-designed by the user to monitor the bending and twisting of a person's body and limbs. The "tape" proves accurate positioning and orientation information all along its length, and is typically used in virtual reality, motion tracking, and robotic control applications.

bob from maine
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not so sure...
bob from maine   6/14/2012 11:09:25 AM
NO RATINGS
I don't this this will work for the casual player other than a gee-whiz effect. For the serious player or the semi pro thinking about making slight changes to improve their game it'd be a huge time saver. Think about the number of good high-school and college players who are having problems with consistency and how quick the feedback would be. There are already shoes that sense pressure and acceleration, wrist sensors for arm speed, the racket completes the package.

ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Not so sure...
ChasChas   6/14/2012 9:44:44 AM
NO RATINGS
 

I agree jayparb1. When a person hits the ball, they almost instantly know what they did right or wrong. But I can see that it may help in understanding a new racket's puzzling quirks.

jayprab1
User Rank
Iron
Not so sure...
jayprab1   6/14/2012 9:24:04 AM
NO RATINGS
As an avid tennis player myself, I am not sure how helpful this would be in improving one's game... You need to be able to hit a stroke and analyze it right away in order to make corrections. A video of your play is absolutely THE best way to do this. Simply seeing an aggregation of data (or even strok-by-stroke data) about your strokes will just tell you where you are hitting the ball by and large and MAY indicate, for instance, that you're reaching for the ball or running into it...

Nancy Golden
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Intelligence to Tennis Rackets
Nancy Golden   6/13/2012 5:11:33 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree with you, Ann - this sounds like a really cool idea but it must be a HUGE challenge to interpret the data accurately and so that it is immediately useful. I am also wondering about the ruggedness of the sensors and associated electronics and if it would have a psychological effect on the person's play knowing they were there...

I also see your point about motion capture devices. I usually ask someone to video me when I am trying to understand something unusual going on when I am riding my horse - it is amazing what I can see in a video that I can also freeze for problem solving. It will be interesting to see how these tennis rackets "play" out! (pardon the pun LOL)

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
An Israeli design student has created a series of unique pieces of jewelry that can harvest energy from default movements of the body and even use human blood as a way to conduct energy.
Made By Monkeys highlights products that somehow slipped by the QC cops.
Artificially created metamaterials are already appearing in niche applications like electronics, communications, and defense, says a new report from Lux Research. How quickly they become mainstream depends on cost-effective manufacturing methods, which will include additive manufacturing.
New software from Carnegie Mellon allows 2D objects -- digital photos, old photos, and even paintings -- to be manipulated in 3D using models found online.
Sharon Glotzer and David Pine are hoping to create the first liquid hard drive with liquid nanoparticles that can store 1TB per teaspoon. They aren't the first to find potential data stores, as Harvard researchers have stored 700 TB inside a gram of DNA.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 18 - 22, Embedded Software Development With Python & the Raspberry Pi
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service