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Automation & Motion Control
Video: Bionic Arm Aids Amputee Soldiers
6/5/2012

An amputee uses a DEKA arm to drink from a bottle of water. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and VA Research are working with DEKA Research to optimize the modular and motorized arm -- the most advanced arm prosthetic to date -- for commercial use. (Source: DEKA)
An amputee uses a DEKA arm to drink from a bottle of water. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency and VA Research are working with DEKA Research to optimize the modular and motorized arm -- the most advanced arm prosthetic to date -- for commercial use.
(Source: DEKA)

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gsmith120
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
gsmith120   7/27/2012 1:49:02 PM
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Nice article Chuck.  Decided to add this link from my April 2012 National Defense Magazine.  http://www.nationaldefensemagazine.org/archive/2012/April/Pages/ProstheticArmControlledbyBrain.aspx

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
Ann R. Thryft   6/12/2012 1:57:08 PM
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Chuck, thanks for posting this link. That story is from 2005. Maybe that technology turned out to be more complicated than developing a robotic arm.

apresher
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Bionic arm
apresher   6/7/2012 9:08:48 AM
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Great stuff.  It only makes sense that the advances in electronic motion control could make a big difference in these types of applications, especially in terms of more advanced movements.  Sensor inputs could be key to expanding the possibilities of this technology.  Thanks.

3drob
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
3drob   6/6/2012 9:32:25 AM
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That is some neat stuff.  I like doing what I'm doing now, but I'd love to be working on something that will have such a profound impact in the immediate quality of people's lives.

It would be useful if Design News published a list of companies doing similar work by region.  Not that I'm looking, but ...

Charles Murray
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
Charles Murray   6/5/2012 7:28:11 PM
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We did a story on a prosthetic that used the nerves to control movement, gsmith120. Maybe this is the one you're thinking of:

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=226412

 

Charles Murray
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Re: My number 2 hand
Charles Murray   6/5/2012 7:26:10 PM
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I agree, Ann. This is a great application of engineering talent.

gsmith120
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
gsmith120   6/5/2012 4:17:51 PM
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It would be nice if the nerves could be used in controlling the arm's movement.  For some reason, I'm thinking I saw a prosthetic limb that was using the nerves to control movement. 

This is a really interesting article and a worthy R&D project. 

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: My number 2 hand
Ann R. Thryft   6/5/2012 3:44:00 PM
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Wow, science fiction come alive is exactly right. This is exciting stuff.

TJ McDermott
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My number 2 hand
TJ McDermott   6/5/2012 10:13:57 AM
"The shoulder, elbow, and wrist pieces can be worn together or separately" immediately brings forth memories of Robert Heinlein's "The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress" in which the protagonist changes prosthetic hands depending on the current task.

Granted the sensor inputs are still a bit primitive, but look at the adances so far!  This is science fiction turned real, and very exciting to see.

Elizabeth M
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Re: 'foot-controlled' prosthetic arm ?
Elizabeth M   6/5/2012 9:44:55 AM
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Yes, since this is still in testing, Glenn, different kinds of controls may come into play in the future as users provide feedback. The hand grips are quite unique and allow for more freedom of movement than merely a static prosthetic hand would.

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