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Materials & Assembly

Lego-Like Industrial Package Reduces Pallets, Shrinkwrap

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Beth Stackpole
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Thought to the full lifecycle
Beth Stackpole   7/16/2012 10:16:02 AM
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This cube looks pretty cool and I love the fact that the engineering team considered the design from cradle to grave and factored in all aspects of how it would be used during its lifecycle. Very creative engineering.

sensor pro
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Gold
Re: Thought to the full lifecycle
sensor pro   7/17/2012 11:19:30 AM
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I completely agree. It looks very futuristic and actually rugged. Very nice engineering design.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Thought to the full lifecycle
Nancy Golden   7/17/2012 12:48:04 PM
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I agree, Beth - very cool. And the reduction in material cost and waste reduction are awesome benefits. I also think it is more aesthetically pleasing than the old wooden pallets - making their delivery straight to the retail floor more palatable in some venues.

Tim
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Re: Thought to the full lifecycle
Tim   7/17/2012 8:34:36 PM
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This a great waste reduction.  At a previous employer, we used similar home built contraptions to hold components on pallets.  The main reason was for cost savings.  A pre-made and well engineered solution like this would have definitely helped with some damaged goods.

Scott Orlosky
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Re: Thought to the full lifecycle
Scott Orlosky   7/22/2012 7:44:25 PM
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This is a very clever idea. Anything that can reduce the waste stream is a plus.  Now if we just get consumers to quit spending money on cheap, disposable products!

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Thought to the full lifecycle
Ann R. Thryft   7/23/2012 12:06:52 PM
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Tim, thanks for that input. Interesting to know that others have aimed at something similar in a homebrew version. Clearly, this has been a problem that needed solving for some time.

TJ McDermott
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Blogger
Tamper proof?
TJ McDermott   7/16/2012 10:29:21 AM
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Stretch wrapping provides a level of tamper-proofing that this doesn't seem to offer.  The image included with the article shows what look like two sides of the cube that are essentially open; one could remove a smaller interior carton quite easily through these openings with out needing a single tool.

Granted, some operation with a knife is only a little more effort, but it does require more effort.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Tamper proof?
Ann R. Thryft   7/16/2012 12:30:16 PM
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TJ, this photo is supplied to show the structure, and it definitely does not show shrinkwrap, although that can be applied. The point is that this reduces the need for it. This comes in somewhat different versions, depending on application, which you can see on the website.

Rob Spiegel
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Blogger
Re: Tamper proof?
Rob Spiegel   7/16/2012 11:31:53 PM
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What a great idea. Seems this team thought things through in a number of directions, including the move to retail display. I'd like to see this packaging gain traction.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
Re: Tamper proof?
Jack Rupert, PE   7/20/2012 3:23:34 PM
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I'm not really sure that they are aiming for it to be tamperproof, per se.  It sounds more like something that would contain the tamperproof items for individual sale and this would be unfolded to create the display.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: Tamper proof?
Ann R. Thryft   7/24/2012 1:17:58 PM
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Jack, I think you're right. To the extent that shrinkwrap provides tamper-proof benefits, then this design can, too. But even shrinkwrap isn't really tamper-proof against a knife or box-cutter.

bobjengr
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Platinum
LOW COST PACKAGING
bobjengr   9/22/2012 1:55:54 PM
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Hello Ann--Great post.  Well you've done it again, made me look like a hero.   My company has been looking for methods to improve packaging and reduce costs for one client; i.e. Universal Assemblies, LLC in East Tennessee.  This looks like one method of doing just that.  They build to order and have minimal inventory of finished products.  The problem arises with companies supplying components in cardboard cartons and not returnables.  We then have to purchase suitable containers to re-ship assemblies.  These must be robust and go the distance relative to shipments by common carriers, UPS, FedEx, etc. etc.  Many thanks for the information.  Again--great information.

 

 

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: LOW COST PACKAGING
Ann R. Thryft   9/24/2012 12:34:48 PM
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bobjengr, glad we can help you look good by providing information you can use to do your job. I wrote about this because it looked like a clever, well thought-out design and execution of a solution to a common problem. Thanks for letting us know you agree.

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