HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

Prosthetic Limbs Mimic Soldiers' Movements

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
great for athletes
NadineJ   5/14/2012 2:28:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks for another fantastic article.  Many service people are naturally athletic.  It's good to see the medical prosthetics industry continuing to offer real quality of life for those who've lost limbs.  Many civilians in the world, mostly children, who lose limbs to land mines could benefit from this also.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: great for athletes
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2012 2:47:37 PM
NO RATINGS

These prosthetic limbs have come a long way in my lifetime. I remember the Viet Nam vets coming how with prosthetic limbs. The vets I knew could hardly walk on their limbs given the pain the prosthetics caused.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: great for athletes
Ann R. Thryft   5/14/2012 3:18:34 PM
NO RATINGS
This is impressive: as Rob says, I also remember the Vietnam vets' artificial limbs and how inadequate they were. This is lightyears ahead.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: great for athletes
Rob Spiegel   5/14/2012 4:10:25 PM
NO RATINGS
I remember how surprising it was when I first saw someone running with a prosthetic leg. I also like the fact they don't try to dress it up to look like a human leg. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: great for athletes
Charles Murray   5/14/2012 6:14:12 PM
NO RATINGS
The soldier shown in the video limps slightly, but his gait is far more natural than what you normally see with wearers of prosthetic limbs. I do wonder how similar this technology is to that of iWalk, a Massachusetts-based company that we've written about proviously. iWalk developed a powered ankle that offers an amazing improvement for prostheses wearers.

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=229761

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Built in redundancy?
TJ McDermott   5/15/2012 2:05:03 AM
NO RATINGS
The article made me think of British WWII fighter pilot Douglas Bader (lost both legs before the war, but still was able to return to duty and become an ace 4 times over).

The article made me think of a common theme found here at Design News this past year, that of battery life.  How long does a charge last for this brilliant prosthetics?  Forget about our smartphone battery life; these are reason enough to dedicate research dollars into better power storage.

inevitably, at some point the battery in them will run out at a less than opportune time.  I wonder if these brilliant prosthetics have some sort of "run flat" mode.  Can they still be used without power?  Maybe not as naturally and effortlessly, but I hope the user isn't left stranded.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Re: great for athletes
NadineJ   5/15/2012 11:26:41 AM
NO RATINGS
@Charles: considering it was his very first time taking steps on the limb he just received the day before, I think his gait is fantastic.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Materials used
Ann R. Thryft   5/15/2012 2:46:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting that one of the materials use is titanium, which apparently has superb properties for structural uses, but is also extremely expensive. For that reason, it's usually confined to military and some medical applications, like surgical instruments, as well as sports.

Greg M. Jung
User Rank
Platinum
Battery Regeneration
Greg M. Jung   5/16/2012 10:14:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Impressive and moving article.  One section mentioned it can recharge while in use.  I'm wondering if this means it connects to external power or if it can recapture some of the work energy and turn it back into electrical energy?

camaro
User Rank
Iron
battery life
camaro   5/18/2012 3:23:55 PM
NO RATINGS
I've seen stuff focusing on kinetic energy for charging batteries for cell phones and media players. I think the adaptation of this technology to these would be straight forward. Battery life should not be an issue. When I walk I charge.

John

 

Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Sharon Glotzer and David Pine are hoping to create the first liquid hard drive with liquid nanoparticles that can store 1TB per teaspoon. They aren't the first to find potential data stores, as Harvard researchers have stored 700 TB inside a gram of DNA.
If you see a hitchhiker along the road in Canada this summer, it may not be human. That’s because a robot is thumbing its way across our neighbor to the north as part of a collaborative research project by several Canadian universities.
SpaceX has 3D printed and successfully hot-fired a SuperDraco engine chamber made of Inconel, a high-performance superalloy, using direct metal laser sintering (DMLS). The company's first 3D-printed rocket engine part, a main oxidizer valve body for the Falcon 9 rocket, launched in January and is now qualified on all Falcon 9 flights.
Stanford University researchers have found a way to realize what’s been called the “Holy Grail” of battery-design research -- designing a pure lithium anode for lithium-based batteries. The design has great potential to provide unprecedented efficiency and performance in lithium-based batteries that could substantially drive down the cost of electric vehicles and solve the charging problems associated with smartphones.
UK researchers have come up with a method for machining aerospace-grade, carbon fiber-reinforced composites, along with high-strength aerospace alloys, using an ultrasonically assisted machining device. It also works on high-strength aerospace alloys.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 18 - 22, Embedded Software Development With Python & the Raspberry Pi
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service