HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

At Indy 500, Rules Make It Tough to Gain Competitive Edge

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/2
ChasChas
User Rank
Platinum
Socialized racing
ChasChas   5/8/2012 10:27:23 AM
NO RATINGS
Timely article, Charles.

This is socialized racing that smacks of communism. I don't know how the teams can stand it. They know what they need to do, but cannot do it - this most certainly encourages "cheating". (just like in any communist country)

Remember when the turbine engine was tried at Indy? Was it too successful, too costly, or too imperialistic?

The rules should encourage broad competition, not secret slyness.

Bradshaw from Primier
User Rank
Iron
Racing innovation
Bradshaw from Primier   5/8/2012 10:01:52 AM
NO RATINGS
Pure racing car design has been stagnant for the last 20 years.  From 1959 to 1979 was perhaps the most revolutionary time of car developement as mid engine cars, wide tires,disc brakes,spoilers, wings,ground effects all appeared in this time.  The racing often became a parade of the fastest cars ahead of the rest and lost fans. Best example of this was the unlimited rules Can Am class, dominated first by Mclaren then by the Porsche 917 Can Am Turbo.  I believe the 917 still holds the record for fastest closed circuit lap...Talledega at 240+mph.  However the series soon died when all knew the Porsche would always win.  Nascar meanwhile has just gotten rid of the 1957 Holley carburetor in favor of fuel injection!!

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Breaking free of constraints
Charles Murray   5/7/2012 6:03:59 PM
NO RATINGS
Beth: Jones said that the 200 data channels include some "math channels," which can crunch some of the numbers and help make sense of it all. That said, I think there's still a lot of manual data mining by the engineering team and the driver, too.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Breaking free of constraints
TJ McDermott   5/7/2012 2:57:54 PM
NO RATINGS
The intent is to make it a driver's race and not a technology race.  I AM surprised the engine is so small though.

jhankwitz
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Breaking free of constraints
jhankwitz   5/7/2012 11:25:07 AM
NO RATINGS
At least Formula 1 has more freedom to experiment with technology.  Options are limited if someone wanted to introduce their new flux-capacitor powered engine to the world. 8^)

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Breaking free of constraints
naperlou   5/7/2012 10:15:49 AM
NO RATINGS
Beth, one effect of the tight rules is that driver skill, and luck on the track, is very important.  Another is that the cost of the cars is kept within some limit.  I saw a special where a famous driver talked about his cars in three series, Formula 1, Indy and NASCAR.  The Formula 1 car cost ten times as much as the Indy car.  Formula 1 has strict rules, but no standard for engines and chasis.  This results in the high cost. 

The engineering challenge in this highly restricted environment are still interesting and fruitful.  It is just another twist on getting the most out of your mahcine.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Breaking free of constraints
Beth Stackpole   5/7/2012 7:17:55 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm pretty surprised to hear that the Indy rules leave such little room for engine modification. It seems like everyone is competing on pretty much the same ground. That said, it's amazing how simple tweaks can cause the break out. I'm curious how the pit crews sift through all that data collected--is it a manual process, simply deciphering print outs or are they able to employ some modern data mining technology to help unearth the nuggets that will give them a competitive advantage?

<<  <  Page 2/2
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
A bold, gold, open-air coupe may not be the ticket to automotive nirvana for every consumer, but Lexus’ LF-C2 concept car certainly turned heads at the recent Los Angeles Auto Show. What’s more, it may provide a glimpse of the luxury automaker’s future.
Perhaps you didn't know that there are a variety of classes, both live and archived, offered via the Design News Continuing Education Center (CEC) sponsored by Digi-Key? The best part – they are free!
Engineer comic Don McMillan explains the fun engineers have with team-building exercises. Can you relate?
The complexity of diesel engines means optimizing their performance requires a large amount of experimentation. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a very useful and intuitive tool in this, and cold flow analysis using CFD is an ideal approach to study the flow characteristics without going into the details of chemical reactions occurring during the combustion.
The damage to Sony from the cyber attack seems to have been heightened by failure to follow two basic security rules.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/10/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Jan 12 - 16, Programmable Logic - How do they do that?
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  67


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service