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3D-Printed Jaw Used in Transplant

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JamesCAnder
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Iron
Re: Applications
JamesCAnder   11/8/2012 4:52:02 PM
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Good for her. So many more people can benefit from this. Has Roger Ebert read this news yet?

JA

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Applications
Beth Stackpole   5/1/2012 6:38:18 AM
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That would be really great if the technology could advance to support that application, Greg. We all know any kind of innovation to help wounded vets lead a normal and functional life is well worth it.

Greg M. Jung
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Platinum
Applications
Greg M. Jung   4/30/2012 9:35:06 PM
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I could also see applications for this technology for veterans who are injured in combat.  This process could grow back a person's bone structure that may have been injured or damaged by an explosion.

Beth Stackpole
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Blogger
Re: Teeth Next??
Beth Stackpole   3/14/2012 7:50:23 AM
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@gsmith120: There does seem to be a lot of activity around 3D printing and dental applications. Check out EOS, a manufacturing of laser sintering platforms. I believe they do a lot of work in the dental segment. Perhaps they have partners using their platforms to create something that could help your daughter.

gsmith120
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Platinum
Teeth Next??
gsmith120   3/14/2012 5:55:27 AM
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Nice article.  My daughter is missing two teeth (never had baby or permanent) and we have been looking at some new technology can would/could allow her grow replacement teeth.  That research has been to be somewhat slow maybe this will be a good option. 

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Titanium Implants
Charles Murray   3/13/2012 10:17:09 PM
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Shelly, glad to hear you're recovering from the surgery. I've known several people who've had similar surgery and the outcome has been good for all of them. Good luck.

Ann R. Thryft
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Blogger
Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Ann R. Thryft   3/7/2012 12:14:52 PM
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I agree, Beth, and I'm sure they will be welcomed by legitimate users. Unfortunately, the illegal organ trade is alive and well in today's supposedly regulated world, which makes me wonder about the illegal trade that could occur in 3D printed organs.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Beth Stackpole   3/6/2012 4:37:19 PM
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In an unregulated world, you're right, Ann. It would be pretty scary. I guess my brain doesn't work that way. I was just thinking that for qualified/certified and totally above board medical institutions, it would be a welcome alternative to organ transplants or the worse alternative--patient loss.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: What about the "back-end" -?
Ann R. Thryft   3/6/2012 4:30:53 PM
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Beth, I hope you are right. maybe I read too much science fiction, but the idea of being able to not only fabricate, but 3D print replacement organs makes me pretty uneasy. OTOH, maybe it would help stop the illegal live/fresh organ trade.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Titanium Implants
Beth Stackpole   3/6/2012 11:27:20 AM
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Glad you're out there listening, Shelly, and by all means, keep the two cents coming. Everyone's input to the conversation is greatly encouraged.

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