HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Materials & Assembly

Additive Manufacturing Tops Materials Trends for 2012

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/2
Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Aluminum and steel
Charles Murray   2/1/2012 7:17:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point about the Cadillac ATS, Dave. With high-strength steel offering much more strength than convntional steel, and with ultra-high-strength offer another big bump up, structural applications can do a lot of lightweighting.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Aluminum and steel
Alexander Wolfe   2/1/2012 4:15:57 PM
NO RATINGS
This may be a pedestrian observation, but it strikes me, from reading your coverage over the past several months, that materials is amid the biggest wave of innovation in years. Bioplastics and composites are just two of the areas which are advancing at an incredible pace. Additive manufacturing similarly made big strides in 2011. Sounds like there's going to be a lot of interesting stuff to write about this year.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Aluminum and steel
Rob Spiegel   2/1/2012 3:30:44 PM
NO RATINGS

I agree, Dave. Steel and aluminum are fighting for their lives as industry looks for lighter, stronger, more environmentally friendly materials. The steel and aluminum industries are working hard to deliver the same -- or superior -- qualities that make composites and plastics attractive.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Aluminum and steel
Ann R. Thryft   2/1/2012 1:19:02 PM
NO RATINGS

Dave, thanks for your links and comments on metals. I plan to start covering them more in the months ahead. The number of breakthroughs and advancements in composites over the last couple of months has been spectacular.

Regarding bioplastics, it's usually--but not always--the single-use kinds that tend to be biodegradable. The durables usually--but not always--are not biodegradable, but can sometimes be recycled. Look for an upcoming feature on bioplastics in March.


Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Aluminum and steel
Dave Palmer   2/1/2012 1:09:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Ann, thanks for mentioning aluminum and steel.  Aluminum and steel technologies are hardly standing still, and they offer a lot of big advantages which are hard to beat.  As Chuck's article about the Cadillac ATS shows, steel can be an important part of lightweighting strategy.  People often forget about the "strength" part of "strength-to-weight ratio," but there's a lot to be said for the strength and stiffness of steel.  And new aluminum alloys are giving composites a run for their money.  Let's not forget about metal-matrix composites, either.

With regard to your last item, it's important to remember that biodegradable and recyclable are two very different things.  Often, biodegradable plastics can't be recycled, and are intended to be landfilled or composted.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: More choice, more applications?
Ann R. Thryft   2/1/2012 12:05:32 PM
NO RATINGS

Beth, I think materials have definitely expanded manufacturers' options for AM, as shown in my recent slideshow:

http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=237571

I don't think there are any general guidelines yet. At this point, it seems to be if it works, do it. But as we've noted elsewhere, medical and dental appliances and implants are pretty big, as are "bridge" parts--a small run of regular parts made while waiting for the larger order that has been delayed--or on-the-spot customized replacements, especially in aerospace and remote locations.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
More choice, more applications?
Beth Stackpole   2/1/2012 7:27:57 AM
NO RATINGS
It is pretty amazing the progress the industry is making on the materials front in terms of providing so many more highly durable, cost effective options for additive manufacturing. Has this wider range of materials options expanded the use of additive manufacturing procedures for manufacturers in any significant way? Are there any general guidelines governing when this route is preferable vs. more traditional manufacturing methods?

 

 

<<  <  Page 2/2
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
2016 engineering grads can expect to earn an average salary of $65,000 right out of the gate. Petroleum engineers' wallets are much fatter, though -- they are expected to earn about $20K more.
3D printing is now adding value to manufacturers at all steps along the business value chain. Come find out how at a talk by John Jaddou at next month's Embedded Systems Conference in Minneapolis.
From IoT and M2M to flexible robotics and consumer HMI, the advances in smart manufacturing are being deployed on the packaging floor.
These new 3D-printing technologies and printers include some that are truly boundary-breaking: a sophisticated new sub-$10,000, 10-plus materials bioprinter, the first industrial-strength silicone 3D-printing service, and a clever twist on 3D printing and thermoforming for making high-quality realistic models.
Ear-based heart-rate monitoring gained momentum recently, as sensor maker Valencell Inc. announced it has licensed its biometric earpiece technology to Samsung Electronics Co. Ltd for use in so-called “hearable devices.”
More:Blogs|News
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 8 - 12, Getting Hands On with Arduino Mechatronics
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7 | 8 | 9 | 10


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2016 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service