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Materials & Assembly

Is Nanomaterial Legislation Coming Soon?

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Beth Stackpole
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Double-edged sword
Beth Stackpole   1/24/2012 10:48:54 AM
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I would imagine that potential legislation governing nanoscale materials has to be a good thing in terms of promoting a healthy and safe environment not only for workers using the new materials, but also end users of products that leverage the new technologies. That said, one can only imagine that legislation might curtail usage and further evolution of these important technologies. Is that the case, Ann? How widespread is nanomaterials so far?

Rob Spiegel
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Europe and Japan will likely go first
Rob Spiegel   1/24/2012 11:33:59 AM
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Nice article, Ann. As with a lot of environmental legislation, the EPA may wait to see what Japan and Europe do before offering any significant regulation. Even then they may hang back. We still don't have a a U.S. RoHS. We don't really need one, since the electronics industry complied to Europe's regulation.

Dave Palmer
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Lack of information
Dave Palmer   1/24/2012 11:41:08 AM
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The Inspector General's report points to the lack of good information about the health effects of nanomaterials.  Some recent studies have found possible heath risks associated with carbon nanotubes.  This is an area which needs further study.  We are only just beginning to learn how materials behave on this scale, never mind how they interact with complex biological organisms such as ourselves.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Double-edged sword
Ann R. Thryft   1/24/2012 11:52:56 AM
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Nanomaterials are extremely widespread at present, Beth, and they're by no means monolithic in shape, size or constitution. They're in food and cosmetics, where much of the consumer-level concern is, but also in a lot of materials being produced in factories, like the industrial chemicals and medical devices mentioned in the article, so there's also concern about worker exposure. In fact, a coalition of consumer safety and environmental groups sued the FDA in December over possible risks from nanomaterials:

http://nanotech.lawbc.com/2011/12/articles/united-states/federal/coalition-sues-fda-over-alleged-risks-from-nanotechnology-and-nanomaterials/

During the reporting of this story, I was reminded of the parallel issues surrounding the maintenance and repair of carbon fiber composites in aircraft, most especially the absence of repair databases and procedures and the difficulty of determining whether damage has even occurred. But in the case of aircraft composites, much of the information is either gettable or available, since composites use in aircraft is not entirely new. In the case of nanomaterials, practically everything is new and very little is known about their effects on human health. 


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Europe and Japan will likely go first
Ann R. Thryft   1/24/2012 11:53:48 AM
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Thanks, Rob, for weighing in with your expertise on related legislation. I think one of the problems here is that the subject potentially either bridges, or falls between the cracks of, some different interests and expertise areas: health, environmental and technological. That's why we're seeing FDA, EPA and NGOs involved, and that will make the legislative and regulatory situation a lot more complex.


Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Lack of information
Ann R. Thryft   1/24/2012 11:54:39 AM
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Dave, thanks for your comments and those links. I think you are totally right on. Much of the research I saw has to do with simply classifying and describing various different types of nanomaterials, and none with their effects. That pattern tells me that a field of study is in its infancy. I find that pretty scary, and am still amazed at how fast these technologies were allowed to grow without being studied first. The concern about their effects is by no means new: I read about it when I was covering this topic a decade ago for a different publication, and as usual, commercial interests trumped safety interests. 


Charles Murray
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Re: Lack of information
Charles Murray   1/24/2012 1:08:14 PM
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Like so many other areas of technology today, this is a case of a technology developing too quickly for researchers and governing agencies to study it and come to any conclusions. We're seeing the same thing in the auto industry, where the pace of electronic development is exceeding the ability of governing agencies to understand the implications.  

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Europe and Japan will likely go first
Rob Spiegel   1/24/2012 1:32:43 PM
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I agree, Ann. The different entities each have their own communities to satisfy. It will be interesting to see how this turns out. There will also likely be political aspects to this since this is an election year.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Lack of information
Ann R. Thryft   1/24/2012 2:38:27 PM
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Chuck, I think you're right. I've seen the same pattern elsewhere to varying degrees, depending on the nature of the technology and its degree of comprehensibility or incomprehensibility to the average non-technical person. In nanomaterials it's been especially problematic because they're especially difficult to comprehend, rather like the early SoCs were to many average folks.


Rob Spiegel
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Re: Lack of information
Rob Spiegel   1/24/2012 2:47:50 PM
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Good points Chuck and Ann. You have to wonder whether the regulatory agencies have the expertise to develop reasonable regulations. RoHS received considerable criticism for not providing sufficient science behind its materials bans. The RoHS folks have made adjustments going forward to respond to scientific challenges.

I can't imagine how this is going work with nanomaterial.

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