HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Automation & Control

Robot Controller Shrinks Cell Floor Space

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller Space, Harder Maintenance
Ann R. Thryft   1/27/2012 11:40:23 AM
NO RATINGS

TJ, those are good points. ABB says it took increased heat and power dissipation into account in this redesign. To make the reconfiguration  possible, the electronics had gotten smaller and dissipate less heat, in addition to changing the orientation of components within the enclosure.


TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Smaller Space, Harder Maintenance
TJ McDermott   1/27/2012 12:16:28 AM
NO RATINGS
Space is always at a premium, but sometimes that premium MUST be paid.  As the control cabinets become smaller, it can get more difficult to maintain what is within.  And, as the conrollers get smaller, the thermal density gets higher.  Smaller control cabinets cannot reject the heat as much as larger ones.  To handle the heat, an active cooling means will be necessary, adding to maintenance.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Ann R. Thryft   1/18/2012 11:49:23 AM
NO RATINGS

From my experience in machine vision, I think the space crunch trend in general has been going on for the last couple of years, or at least that's when I started hearing about it. It might have been building up for an even longer period before that.


Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Rob Spiegel   1/18/2012 10:27:27 AM
NO RATINGS
It does seem odd this new pressure for space. For years all you heard was the need for more uptime. Even the pressure on energy efficiency is relatively new. Now there's pressure on integration, data sharing, networking, workflow, alternative energies, even efficiency in HVAC. Space is a new one.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Charles Murray   1/17/2012 7:33:43 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree that using less floor space certainly resonates with the front office. But I would imagine it also affects time management. Moving, picking and placing of materials must be faster when the distances travelled are smaller.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Alexander Wolfe   1/17/2012 7:08:58 PM
NO RATINGS
I can see this from the seller side. I'm interested in how widespread the space-savings demand is on the user end and how much of a competitive advantage this is becoming for vendors like ABB and others who embrace it. Is it a must-have or just a want-to-have? (Also, which other vendors are doing this too?)

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Ann R. Thryft   1/17/2012 3:29:56 PM
NO RATINGS
 

I started hearing about taking up less factory floor and plant space during the last couple of years in machine vision contexts. But I'm hearing about it a lot more now regarding robotics cell sizes, in particular regarding to automotive manufacturing, and also in more industrial contexts. If power supplies are getting the same pressure, sounds like a major trend in progress.

 

 

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Smaller space, smaller investment
Rob Spiegel   1/17/2012 2:46:35 PM
NO RATINGS
Until recently, I hadn't heard much about designing plant systems to take up less space. Right now I'm working on an article about power supplies for plants being designed smaller so they take up less space in crowded control cabinets.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Smaller space, smaller investment
Beth Stackpole   1/17/2012 7:44:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Against the continuing backdrop of tight budgets, anything that can help shrink cell floor space has to resonate with the bean counters in manufacturing companies. Being able to increase robotics functionality without eating up pricey and precious manufacturing square footage is a huge benefit for plant operators looking to bring more automation onto the factory floor.

Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Conventional wisdom holds that MIT, Cal Tech, and Stanford are three of the country’s best undergraduate engineering schools. Unfortunately, when conventional wisdom visits the topic of best engineering schools, it too often leaves out some of the most distinguished programs that don’t happen to offer PhD-level degrees.
Sherlock Ohms highlights stories told by engineers who have used their deductive reasoning and technical prowess to troubleshoot and solve the most perplexing engineering mysteries.
Airbus Defence and Space has 3D printed titanium brackets for communications satellites. The redesigned, one-piece 3D-printed brackets have better thermal resistance than conventionally manufactured parts, can be produced faster, cost 20% less, and save about 1 kg of weight per satellite.
A group of researchers at the Seoul National University have discovered a way to take material from cigarette butts and turn it into a carbon-based material that’s ideal for storing energy and creating a powerful supercapacitor.
Hacking has a long history in the movies, beginning with Tron and War Games and continuing through The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service