HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Materials & Assembly

Adhesives May Predict Structural Failures in Planes

NO RATINGS
< Previous Page 2 / 2
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
A path to finding flaws?
Rob Spiegel   12/16/2011 1:45:27 PM
NO RATINGS
 

Nice story, Ann. This is a good companion to your earlier article on composites and the difficulty in detecting and fixing failures in the aircraft industry. Are adhesives part of the solution to the challenges you outlined in your other article?

 

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Re: A path to finding flaws?
Jennifer Campbell   12/16/2011 1:50:32 PM
NO RATINGS
The self-monitoring aspect of this story is what fascinates me the most. I'd like to read more about this topic, especially what other areas something like this is being used in. Ann, do you happen to know?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A path to finding flaws?
Ann R. Thryft   12/16/2011 1:53:26 PM
NO RATINGS

Thanks, Rob. Yes, the hope here seems to be that since the use of adhesives is increasing massively along with the use of composites,  adhesives can help provide an early-warning system for detecting structural problems in aircraft. Reading about nanotechnology and its possible applications is like reading about science fiction, far more so than most other leading-edge technologies. I covered early carbon tube and carbon wire R&D efforts several years ago, so it was heartening to see that it's advanced to the level of possible real-world applications. Although this, of course, is still in R&D.


Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A path to finding flaws?
Ann R. Thryft   12/16/2011 1:55:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Jenn, it's all still in R&D, so the only things available to read are rather dense research reports.

Lauren Muskett
User Rank
Platinum
Re: A path to finding flaws?
Lauren Muskett   12/16/2011 2:15:03 PM
NO RATINGS

It would be great if adhesives could help provide a warning for structural problems in an aircraft. I look forward to see the progress of this through research and development. 


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: A path to finding flaws?
Beth Stackpole   12/16/2011 3:28:15 PM
NO RATINGS
The idea that some sort of nanotechnology adhesive can help predict a structural failure in a composite airplane wing is definitely science fiction-like. How far away is this technology from being commercialized given that composites are increasingly being deployed in planes?

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Understanding failure mechanisms
Charles Murray   12/16/2011 5:06:28 PM
NO RATINGS
This should contribute greatly to our understanding of failure mechanisms of composites in real-world applications. After all, failure mechanisms of steels is well understood, but composites are in still comparatively new in many of these applications. This is an important story.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
What is being measured?
Dave Palmer   12/16/2011 6:06:00 PM
NO RATINGS
@Ann: Can you walk me through how a sensor like this would work? I understand that Professor Meguid's group is studying how alignment of the nanotubes or nanowires affects the electrical conductivity of the adhesive.  Is the idea that the presence of a crack would alter the alignment of the nanotubes or nanowires, and that this could be measured as a change in conductivity?

The use of the term "percolation threshold" seems to indicate that they are using graph theory, which is a good example of how seemingly abstract branches of mathematics can sometimes have extremely practical uses.

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Adhesives could predict failure in composite materials
William K.   12/19/2011 11:00:16 AM
NO RATINGS
I can see how this could indeed work to indicate the start of failure. That part does make sense. But the question comes as to how to reset the detection scheme after the repairs are done. In the same way that embedded fiber optics do detect failures, the change is permanent and nonreverseable. Broken fibers and gaps between the microfibers just do not repair. The fix is a replacement. So while the detection system could work, the repairs would equate to replacements. 

przemek
User Rank
Gold
Re: What is being measured?
przemek   12/19/2011 1:19:46 PM
NO RATINGS
'percolation' is a physical phenomenon, referring to topological arrangements within a multi-component solid. Imagine for instance a matrix of substance A with embedded uniform spheres of conductive substance B. As you increase the concentration of B, at some point they will start touching each other on a macroscopic scale, so that the material would become conductive---that would be an example of percolation. The concept is used in many contexts, for instance to describe flow of oil through pores in a rock matrix.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Get a load of these strange product designs. What's in the water these design engineers are drinking?
The Dutch are known for their love of bicycling, and they’ve also long been early adopters of green-energy and smart-city technologies. So it seems fitting that a town in which painter Vincent van Gogh once lived has given him a very Dutch-like tribute -- a bike path lit by a special smart paint in the style of the artist's “Starry Night” painting.
Cal Poly students use 3D printing to take flight -- and pass their class.
Celebrity engineer Grant Imahara will host a series of “webisodes” that will examine new technology and innovation from an engineer’s point of view.
The UX Italia video contest recognizes Italian machinery, technology, and other experience solutions that have contributed meaningful improvements to people’s lives and production processes. If you submit a three-minute video showcasing how the quality of Italian machinery's User eXperience is essential to your company's success, you just may win a trip to Italy.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
11/19/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
11/6/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 17 - 21, Analog Design for the Digital World
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service