HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Product News
Design Hardware & Software
Nvidia Maximus Brings HPC Capabilities to the Workstation
11/23/2011

Hewlett-Packard's Z800 workstations can be configured with Nvidia Maximus technology.
Hewlett-Packard's Z800 workstations can be configured with Nvidia Maximus technology.

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
HPC becomes commonplace
Alexander Wolfe   11/23/2011 7:55:53 AM
NO RATINGS
The sea change in computing capabilities over the past decade is that compute cycles have become essentially free. So whereas circa 1995, a PC cost more than $1,000 and its processing power was limited, today you can build your own quad-core box with a 3-GHz processor for under $1k. Such a machine can rapidly render video, as well as speedily run complex FEA and CFD simulations. In such a context, HPC really no longer refers (or should no longer refer) to a demarcation in compute capability, but rather to the OS (Microsoft HPC etc). I realize that I'm a little ahead of the curve here, and that's not the common usage, and indeed there are still workstations which go above and beyond the quad core of my example. But as they say on the street corner, I'm just sayin...

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: HPC becomes commonplace
Beth Stackpole   11/23/2011 8:02:22 AM
NO RATINGS
Good point. HPC is now more readily being used to denote a certain level of compute horsepower, which traditionally has only been available in special compute clusters locked away in some room somewhere. As a central resource, engineers and other users typically have had to put their jobs in queue, which could take days or even weeks before their processing needs were handled.

NVIDA Maximus (along with many other emerging technologies) is attempting to change that use case, putting HPC-level computing power on the desktop workstation platform and freeing up resources so that same workstation can be used for other tasks while the simulation or rendering job grinds away in the background.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: HPC becomes commonplace
Ann R. Thryft   11/23/2011 11:50:38 AM
NO RATINGS

HPC on the desktop is, indeed, a sea change. It's also invading, if that's the right word, machine vision. Standalone machine vision systems based on powerful controller boxes are a trend, including at least one based on HPC:

http://www.tmworld.com/article/446265-High_performance_computing_speeds_image_data_processing.php

Similarly, these can help free up the PC running a control system that includes machine vision functions by handling compute-intensive image processing tasks.


Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: HPC becomes commonplace
Beth Stackpole   11/28/2011 7:27:30 AM
NO RATINGS
Mision vision is a great application for HPC as is simulation and high-end rendering. As the cost comes down and more enabling technologies come into play, I think we'll see even more headway and a greater variety of applications that weren't possible on a desktop platform.

Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Samsung's Galaxy line of smartphones used to fare quite well in the repairability department, but last year's flagship S5 model took a tumble, scoring a meh-inducing 5/10. Will the newly redesigned S6 lead us back into star-studded territory, or will we sink further into the depths of a repairability black hole?
Fifteen European research centers have launched EuroCPS to help European companies develop innovative products for the Internet of Things.
Get your Allman Brothers albums ready. The iconic Volkswagen Microbus may be poised for a comeback, and this time it could be electric.
In 2003, the world contained just over 500 million Internet-connected devices. By 2010, this figure had risen to 12.5 billion connected objects, almost six devices per individual with access to the Internet. Now, as we move into 2015, the number of connected 'things' is expected to reach 25 billion, ultimately edging toward 50 billion by the end of the decade.
NASA engineer Brian Trease studied abroad in Japan as a high school student and used to fold fast-food wrappers into cranes using origami techniques he learned in library books. Inspired by this, he began to imagine that origami could be applied to building spacecraft components, particularly solar panels that could one day send solar power from space to be used on earth.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
3/31/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
2/25/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
12/11/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
5/7/2015 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Apr 20 - 24, Taking the Internet of Things to the Cloud
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6 |  7


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Last Archived Class
Sponsored by Proto Labs
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2015 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service