HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Feature
Electronics & Test

Slideshow: 2012 Consumer Electronics Show (CES) Preview

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Just in time for the holidays
Beth Stackpole   11/10/2011 6:40:55 AM
NO RATINGS
What a great compilation of fun gear--for engineers and non-engineers alike. I see huge potential for the TailGater and in my house, it's those MOD ski googles that are most-likely candidates for the wish list. Interesting they transmit data to Android phones--no mention of iPhones ... maybe says something about the target audience.

I have a couple of electrical engineering buddies I know would go gaga over the Lutron Home Control system. Personally, the Lytro camera system seems like it could help people like me who are photographically challenged.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Nice gadgets
Rob Spiegel   11/10/2011 10:53:11 AM
NO RATINGS
Nice set of gadgets, Alex. I remember about 15 years ago at a family runion, my three brothers and I were contemplating technology of the future. We came up with two ideas: systems on cars that would prevent collisions and a cooler that could cool instantly the way microwaves heat instantly.

Looks like the blast chiller is here.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
CES moving on
Charles Murray   11/10/2011 12:22:00 PM
NO RATINGS
Nice to see that CES is moving beyond HDTV and 3D-TV (one year they even had a large area of recliners for watching HDTVs). This is a great collection of innovative products. I want to know how that blast chiller works.

Tim
User Rank
Platinum
CES Gadgets
Tim   11/10/2011 7:41:28 PM
NO RATINGS
There are a lot of gadgets that relate directly to Smartphones.  This is a great marraige of technologies.  Good to see the Smartphone being used for personal health instead of just playing "Angry Birds".

OhmsLaw
User Rank
Gold
Re: CES Gadgets
OhmsLaw   11/11/2011 12:18:25 AM
NO RATINGS
I once interfaced a $10 LED Calculator in 1977 to a momentary lever micro-switch for stationary running and then 4 large LED digits . Each step would do the equivalent of pressing the Equal key "=" after the jogger would enter +1  or an initial calorie count and then from an exercise table -0.035 or whatever for counting down calories. then start jogging with waist high steps ( great calorie burner) bounce = bounce = bounce on the foam supported wooden board = = = = = = = = = = = = count them calories down

Not bad for $30 in parts with charger in the late 70's with 1" big 7 segment LED digits.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Redefining design engineering
Alexander Wolfe   11/14/2011 6:44:45 PM
NO RATINGS
I was gratified to see that many of the products at the CES preview had more to them then just the usual phone/TV/computer thing going on. There seems to be a real movement this year to plumb new areas of design and come up with original applications. One way to look at it is embedded is going consumer, as we see with the NEST thermostat.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
The 54-year light bulb
Charles Murray   11/18/2011 5:29:44 PM
NO RATINGS
And LED bulb that lasts 20,000 hours? If I turn on that light an hour per day, it will last 54 years, nine months and 15 days.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
Adapting emerging technologies to familiar products
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/28/2011 7:09:04 AM
NO RATINGS

A couple of you have already commented about previous CES offerings; particularly Alex’s comment of the  heavy focus on Phone/Laptop/TV  ,,,, In years past it was referred to as the 3 screens, and APP developers were challenged how to get their wares fully functional on all 3, considering the differences in screen aspect ratios, processing power, etc.  Now, Its wonderfully refreshing to see our electronics culture slowly crawling out of the box and adapting emerging technologies to familiar products.  Such as the sensing ski goggles; taking automotive sensing technologies which we’ve recently discussed and applying it to other fast-moving entities, such as a down-hill skier.  That’s innovative thinking.

Alexander Wolfe
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Adapting emerging technologies to familiar products
Alexander Wolfe   11/28/2011 2:48:02 PM
NO RATINGS
Regarding Jim's point about innovative thinking, I have the definite sense that we're passed some kind of tipping point where vendors are thinking less about "I have to cram a bunch of screens into my product" and more "what can I do to make something useful." In other words, they're designing stuff instead of just assembling components. I hope that sense will be borne out further by what I see on the show floor at CES in January.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
User Rank
Blogger
More thoughts on CES
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   11/29/2011 1:23:51 AM
NO RATINGS

Couple more thoughts about the CES slideshow; Slide 6, the health monitors winning a “Best of Innovations”  is surprising because that concept was shown at least 7 years ago in ‘05.  Still a good idea, and overdue to become fully commercialized, but it’s not “brand-new”,,, Same goes for the Home monitoring system shown on Slide 8.  This idea has numerous instances of prior art, but now that the extremely pervasive iPad runs the APP, it gets a brighter spotlight.  (Steve Jobs is still getting his well-deserved  limelight!)

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Self-driving vehicle technology could grow rapidly over the next two decades, with nearly 95 million “autonomous-capable” cars being sold annually around the world by 2035, a new study predicts.
MIT’s Senseable City Lab recently announced the program’s next big project: “Local Warming.” The concept involves saving on energy by heating the occupants within a room, not the room itself.
The fun factor continues to draw developers to Linux. This open-source system continues to succeed in the market and in the hearts and minds of developers. Design News will delve into this territory with next week's Continuing Education Class titled, “Introduction to Linux Device Drivers.”
Dean Kamen tells an audience at MD&M East 2014 how his team created the DEKA Arm to meet DARPA's challenge to design a better prosthetic arm for wounded veterans.
The new draw-it-on-a-napkin is the CAD program. As CAD programs become more ubiquitous and easier to use, they have replaced 2D sketching for early concepting.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service