HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Design Hardware & Software

Maplesoft Schools Students With iPad App

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
Page 1/2  >  >>
vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
computer and creativity
vimalkumarp   11/28/2011 12:35:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Anne's thoughts are really worth its value in gold. I know another Anne

http://annenberg.usc.edu/Faculty/Communication%20and%20Journalism/BalsamoA.aspx

whose works may answer the questions on culture and technology.

please also have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brenda_Laurel

 

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: child is the father of man
Ann R. Thryft   11/28/2011 12:28:49 PM
NO RATINGS

While I wouldn't want to go back to the typewriter--my writing and thinking speed has increased by several times writing with a computer--I think Alex's point about mechanical pencils is well taken. For one thing, drawing and writing are very different hand-eye-brain coordination processes. 

OTOH, I know that being able to rapidly assimilate and compare a lot of data, as is possible with a computer, may spur thinking to new heights, or maybe breadths. I wonder how much, if any, research has been done about the effects of computer use on creativity. 


vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
child is the father of man
vimalkumarp   11/26/2011 1:59:07 AM
NO RATINGS
I think Maplesoft has given a new dimension to Wordsworth's  " child is the father of man" . This will definitely make the new generation of technologists have a feel of the world outside academia and the demands of industry.

 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Maplesoft
Beth Stackpole   11/23/2011 1:49:34 PM
NO RATINGS
I think both Ann and Dave make sound points. Arbitrarily eschewing calculators or mathematical software (and now apps) just because they're considered a short cut is short sided. It's got to be the engineer's choice, but what isn't a choice is learning the basic principles and understanding how to apply them to the task at hand regardless of which approach you take.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Maplesoft
Ann R. Thryft   11/21/2011 11:34:34 AM
NO RATINGS
This reminds me of toughing it out in statistics class way back in the day when calculators were first allowed in college math classes. They were extremely expensive, high-end TI devices and I opted to do without.

I didn't do any better in that class than my calculator-equipped colleagues, but I did come out of it with the ability to do long division in my head (as well as the other basic operations). Today, I prefer the calculator for those tasks, but I can do it myself, on paper or in my head, if need be. I think that's the whole point here: having the choice, and being master of the tool so you understand how it works, and of the task, so you understand how it fits into the whole problem, aka your design.

Dave Palmer
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Maplesoft
Dave Palmer   11/18/2011 6:43:02 PM
NO RATINGS
@Beth: I think the comparison to a calculator is apt.  I tutor high school students for the ACT.  They are often surprised at first by my ability to solve problems without a calculator. (A calculator is allowed, but all of the problems are designed to be solvable without a calculator).  However, they quickly see the benefit of being able to think through a problem without a calculator - even if you ultimately use a calculator to arrive at the answer.  No matter what tools you have at your disposal, it's your brain that actually solves problems.

Ideally, students should come out of school knowing both how to use tools and how to think.  For a long time, it was thought that students still needed to learn manual drafting techniques before they could be taught CAD; it was thought that CAD would "spoil" them.  Thankfully, this attitude seems to have faded away.

I don't think that access to mobile Maplesoft apps will "spoil" anyone, as long as they understand that they are a tool, and not a substitute for thought.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Maplesoft
Beth Stackpole   11/18/2011 3:32:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Interestingly, I talked to a couple of engineers about this the other day and most were likening these tools to a calculator. There are some, they said, that will maintain that a calculator is a cheat sheet. But how many engineers today rely on calculators without that reliance completing obviating the need to understand core math prinicples.

Clearly, it's essential for the engineering students to master the basics first, then take advantage of any tools that will make their life easier. As some folks I talked to suggested, some of that onus needs to be on the professors and engineering curriculum to establish knowledge of the basics before serving up the tool.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Maplesoft
Ann R. Thryft   11/15/2011 2:50:01 PM
NO RATINGS
I would worry about the same thing. Over-dependence on a tool can practically cripple students and future engineers. On the other hand, if the tool helps stimulate creativity, I think that's its greatest value.

SparkyWatt
User Rank
Platinum
Maplesoft
SparkyWatt   11/15/2011 9:53:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Actually, the problem with getting a tool like Maplesoft into students hands early is that they won't learn to do it themselves.  They will be dependant on the tool.

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Counterintuitive
Beth Stackpole   11/15/2011 6:28:31 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree, Rob. Saw that same 60 Minutes episode. With the right interpretation, mobile design tools can really open up possibilities and give aspiring engineers a good head start. It's the interpretation that's so important and forgive me for repeating myself, but the solutions need to be enablers for better, more creative and productive thinking, not for taking short cuts or missing out on the fundamentals.

Page 1/2  >  >>
Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
During a teardown of the iPad Air and Microsoft Surface Pro 3 at the Medical Design & Manufacturing Show in Schaumburg, Ill., an engineer showed this "inflammatory" video about the dangers of maliciously mishandling lithium-ion batteries.
The Window Watcher stops the burglar before he does damage or enters the house. House alarm service companies set off alarms and call the service only after the burglar has damaged and entered the house.
If you’re designing a handheld device or industrial machine that will employ a user interface, then you’ll want to check out the upcoming Design News Continuing Education Center course, "Engineering Principles Behind Advanced User Interface Technologies.”
Brooke Williams of Texas Instruments explains how TI’s new TDA3x chip will help future vehicles “see” all around themselves.
It's been two years since the Mac Mini's last appearance on iFixit's teardown table, but a newly revised version joins Apple's lineup this week.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Nov 3 - 7, Engineering Principles behind Advanced User Interface Technologies
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Next Class: 11/11-11/13 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Littelfuse
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service