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Materials & Assembly

Prototyping Your Way out of a Mess

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Alexander Wolfe
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Re: Prototyping your way out of a mess..
Alexander Wolfe   11/17/2011 3:38:54 PM
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The rise of PLM and end-to-end tool chains which essentially facilitate feedback (implementation of engineering changes after the initial prototyping phase) is a very important aspect of this process. We're going to explore this further in an upcoming edition of Design News Radio. Please click on the link to register: Bridging the Mechanical & Embedded Design Worlds.

William K.
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Prototyping your way out of a mess..
William K.   8/3/2011 10:50:02 AM
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I agree that the living hinge and the snap-togather are very critical features that would demand a lot out of any prototype. So I am impressed that it worked well. I would offer an opinion that icons are stupid and numbers would be a far more universal method. Also, probably easier to read in poor light, if an appropriate font and size were used. Numbers plus colors could easily provide at least 40 discrete identities, which should be enough for most folks. Hopefully the buttons can be opened for removal and re-use, and to correct installation errors. This would be the best point in competing against the non-reusable cable ties that are also used for cable identification.

David McCollum
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Love it!
David McCollum   8/3/2011 9:59:55 AM
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Love the idea. So much more professional than the double fold of masking tape I have meen using for the past hundred years. I hope we see these for sale soon.

Rob Spiegel
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Re: Simple, yet genius
Rob Spiegel   8/3/2011 8:28:31 AM
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Wonderful idea. Using a color piece at both ends of the cord may preclude the need for an image. In many places in my house, it would be difficult to see the image (under the TV cabinet). But the color would be easy to spot. If there were a corresponding color doohicky at the appliance end, the image wouldn't be necessary.

BobGroh
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Nice idea!
BobGroh   8/2/2011 6:38:19 PM
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What a nice idea!  I wonder if it handles round cords as well as the flat ones. Now all I need is better knee's and a helmet with a light on it (all for obvious reasons).

Lauren Muskett
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Re: Simple, yet genius
Lauren Muskett   8/2/2011 12:17:49 PM
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Agreed, it is simple yet full of fuctionality. Being able to place a generic photo into the dotz makes it an easy solution for identifying cords.

Beth Stackpole
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Simple product, smart development strategy
Beth Stackpole   8/2/2011 12:14:38 PM
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Interesting story of what appears to be a high utility product. Just goes to show you what seems simple in terms of concept and even design, doesn't necessarily translate that way when it comes to exploring the optimal manufacturing and production methods. This is a nice example of how prototyping services priced within reach can give even the bootstrapping inventor an actual chance of bringing product to market. Nicely done, Micah.

Jennifer Campbell
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Simple, yet genius
Jennifer Campbell   8/2/2011 12:12:25 PM
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This is one of those simple, yet genius inventions that make you say, "Now why didn't I think of that."

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