HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
News
Electronics & Test

Resistive Panels Move Into Multi-Touch Space

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Newest First|Oldest First|Threaded View
phil
User Rank
Iron
High Performance Resistive Multi-Touch
phil   7/1/2011 2:35:03 PM
NO RATINGS
As the CEO of SiMa Systems, Inc., I am glad the resistive multi-touch (M-T) technology is getting the attention it deserves. We, at SiMa, feel strongly our resistive M-T solution out performs all other resistive and capacitive M-T solutions, both for touch screens and touch pads.

Specifically-12 pts/mm resolution, 1,000+ pts/sec update rate, force measurement, scalability from 3" to 85"displays and extremely low power. There is no other M-T technology can approximate these specifications, in the public domain.

Currently the only advantage capacitive M-T provides is slightly better optics and percieved durability. The disadvantages of capacitive M-T is very low resolution, very slow update rates, very limited scalability, bare finger only input and very high cost.

As users become exposed to the distinct advantages of resistive M-T we feel there will be a definite shift to resistive M-T as the preferred touch solution.

Market trends also favor resistive M-T. With the explosive growth of AMOLEDs resistive M-T will more than likely become the dominant technology for these displays because the sensor can be located 'behind' the display (current capacitive cannot be located 'behind' the display). This provides for the full benefits of the AMOLED because it does not compromise the the brilliant optics as capacitive does when located on top of the AMOLED. SiMa has filed for patents for a new material stack-up that eliminates the air-gap normally associated with resistive sensors and, in doing so, increases durability beyound capacitve M-T solutions and drives the cost below 4-wire resistive solutions.

Touch pads are another major opportunity for resistive M-T and actually may have a larger market in terms of units in the coming years but I will save that discussion for another time.

SiMa's M-T is complete and available for demonstration. SiMa is also in the process of packaging our technology into a proprietary IC. Yes, the future is bright for resistive M-T.

Phil Coyne  

  

 

Beth Stackpole
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Why didn't they think of that?
Beth Stackpole   6/30/2011 6:33:39 PM
NO RATINGS
I've run into the same problem on my iPhone. I think as resistive technology makes its way into new ruggedized devices, be it handhelds or tablets, we'll see a lot more use of these things on the factory floor, as part of control and automation systems or who knows what kind of uses. I'm sure Apple had a good reason for going with capacitive technology, but I'm not so sure they say saw an enterprise manufacturing role for the iPad. Maybe competition will cause them to think differently.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Harsh Environments
Jack Rupert, PE   6/30/2011 4:54:16 PM
NO RATINGS
I wonder how those multi-touch screens will work in harsh environments when the dirt is more than finger grease.

Rob Spiegel
User Rank
Blogger
Multi-Touch screens
Rob Spiegel   6/30/2011 12:13:28 PM
NO RATINGS
1 saves
I tried one of these screens at a Microsoft conference. It was one of those large desktop screens. Two or three people were performing tasks simultaneously. I'm not sure how multi-touch would work on a small screen like a phone, but I can certainly see its value on a tablet.

Jennifer Campbell
User Rank
Gold
Why didn't they think of that?
Jennifer Campbell   6/30/2011 10:54:36 AM
NO RATINGS
Seems to me Apple was a bit short-sighted in its use of capacitive technology on its touch screens. I can't tell you how many times I have mistakenly tried to use a fingernail, or a gloved hand in the winter, on my iPhone - it only ends in frustration. With competitors looking toward resistive technology, would Apple consider changing its strategy on its touch screens? I think it would be a smart move.

Partner Zone
Latest Analysis
Factory floor engineers may soon be able to operate machinery and monitor equipment status simply by tapping their eyeglasses.
GE Aviation not only plans to use 3D printing to mass-produce metal parts for its LEAP jet engine, but it's also developing a separate technology for 3D-printing metal parts used in its other engines.
In this TED presentation, Wayne Cotter, a computer engineer turned standup comic, explains why engineers are natural comedians.
IBM's new SyNAPSE chip makes it possible for computers to both memorize and compute simultaneously.
The “Space Kid,” 11, will be one of the first civilians to have his design manufactured in space by NASA, thanks to the City X Project, which inspires kids to think about new 3D-printed inventions that could be useful for humans living in space.
More:Blogs|News
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development – A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service