HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Sponsored Blogs
Sponsored Blog

The Future of Design Is Cloudy

NO RATINGS
View Comments: Threaded|Newest First|Oldest First
richnass
User Rank
Blogger
fear of the cloud
richnass   1/10/2013 5:08:44 PM
NO RATINGS
I may be alone here, but I'm guessing that I'm not. I have a fear that my design could be compromised and/or stolen if I leave it in the cloud. What measures are you taking to ensure the safety of my design? I know it's an old argument, but it's still valid.

mtripoli3
User Rank
Gold
However - how good is your connection?
mtripoli3   1/11/2013 11:14:23 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm becoming more and more a fan of the "cloud" every day. I use it routinely (Dropbox) to work on projects at home and work. I save my work, go home, and there it is. I save a file and a colleague can open it almost instantly on his machine. However, just yesterday I was working with another colleague (that lives on the East Coast in a small town) and said "How's your internet connection?" to which he replied "Terrible, it's a pain just checking my email, at work and home". In this case the entire "cloud" becomes moot. So what if it's convenient if you can't transfer the data? How does a fast local machine help in this instance? This will be the biggest problem with all cloud services; if you can't transfer data the entire thing falls apart. The biggest proponents of the technology have very fast connections or even T1 and greater services available. This is not isolated either; there are many reports of how the ISP services still haven't rolled out high speed equipment to more rural areas (despite denying that they do this) and charge the same fees for "high speed". I know of one person that had their ISP confirm the system was bad; their response was to finally simply stop going out to his location. Until everyone has high speed connections, all the fancy, fast machines will mean absolutely nothing "in the cloud".

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Re: However - how good is your connection?
tekochip   1/11/2013 11:23:12 AM
NO RATINGS
That's a major issue.  I was at a company that simply kept all parts on the server and the amount of traffic required as every single screw (we even had one guy that drew threads on screws) and washer was pulled into a design brought the company's server to its knees.  I can't imagine having a staff of engineers doing the same damage to a web gateway.


William K.
User Rank
Platinum
Re: However - how good is your connection?
William K.   1/14/2013 5:52:03 PM
NO RATINGS
On another blog we just are talking about "the connection." My present access does slow at times, occasionally getting down to perhaps 330 Baud. NOT KBaud, just Baud. Just a bit faster than I type. So a 22K one page letter takes a while, a 2 page PDF takes minutes, and even small executable files take a LONNNGG time. So what good is a slow connection? How slow is a slow cloud?

With the descriptions of the different kinds of "cloud", the one common item is the connection. Running AutoCad from a local server was bad, I can't imagine how very bad running a more powerful cad program over a longer link would be.

As for security, backing up to offsite backup servers every night is a bout as safe from loss as data can be, while keeping the servers behind three physically locked levels of security is insurance against physical theft, and a really good firewall, plus file encryption, is a fair protection against hacking the data. But the most secure system that I am aware of keeps all of the vital data on a non-internet-connected machine. Data that must be sent out is copied to a memory stick and then sent from a connected computer. NO, it is not very convenient, but it is more secure.

NadineJ
User Rank
Platinum
Exactly!
NadineJ   1/11/2013 12:51:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Everyone's comments are on point.

Theft-it may be easier for those who are very tech saavy to steal ideas but that happens in the analogue world today.  I learned years ago to 'give it away', so to speak.  Thieves will always look for opportunity to steal ideas but good designers will always create more ideas.

Accessibility-one unfortunate reality that is rarely addressed is accessibility.  Connecting securely to the internet is expensive for most and even unrealistic for some.  Many small companies or even individuals struggle with paying for a fast and reliable connection.  If everything is in the cloud, you have to stay connected. 

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Exactly!
mrdon   1/20/2013 10:51:34 PM
NO RATINGS
NadineJ, I agree. Open source is the way to go for designs that have no profit margin associated with them and placing them on Cloud servers will not be a concern. I would still use traditional methods of backup data storage devices such as harddrives and thumbdrives to ensure I will always have a copy of my designs. Also, IP theft can happen within the IT corporate Cloud server organization just as easily from a hacker on the outside. Be responsible and backup your own data.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exactly!
Jack Rupert, PE   1/26/2013 5:08:47 PM
NO RATINGS
Absolutely, mrdon!  Maybe I'm paranoid, but I like keeping a copy of my backups under my exclusive control.  That way if anything happens from a natural disaster to a business going under or servers being hacked, I don't lose my stuff.

mrdon
User Rank
Gold
Re: Exactly!
mrdon   1/26/2013 8:51:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Jack, Thanks for the support. In some cases I make paper copies of my designs to backup storage devices for possible electronic failure as well.

Jack Rupert, PE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Exactly!
Jack Rupert, PE   2/25/2013 3:39:26 PM
NO RATINGS
I haven't gone that far, yet, mrdon, although this past week suggests that maybe I should have.  Somehow, I lost something I spent a week working on.  I couldn't resurrect the file using the standard recovery tools.  In this case, I'm thinking that it wasn't electronics failure, but PEBKAC.

Kirsten Billhardt
User Rank
Blogger
Security in the cloud
Kirsten Billhardt   1/13/2013 8:38:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi all - love all the great comments here!  Security is absolutely an ongoing challenge and concern, and an area that varies quite a bit between providers.  Our public cloud offerings like vCloud are designed with security at the forefront and are secured using Secureworks and monitored 24x7.    

Something else to consider is that when data is stored on the device, there is risk around the device itself being lost or stolen, and then the data may be at risk if not well protected.   Many customers (certainly not all, as these comments attest to!) are coming to the conclusion that the overall risk profile is lower with cloud models.

 

DennisNagy
User Rank
Iron
Engineering Simulation and Design "in The Cloud"
DennisNagy   1/20/2013 12:36:06 PM

UberCloud HPC Experiment

I wanted to make you aware of (and hopefully get DesignNews to publicize) an important not-for-profit (volunteer) vendor-neutral activity that should be of interest to your readers. I've joined the "HPC (Ueber-Cloud) Experiment" as a Mentor/Supervisor of multiple teams and also to help publicize and grow this project investigating the actual processes and obstacle for engineers who currently do desktop/workstation CAE simulation (FEA, CFD) and have a need to "scale up" to occasional/heavy HPC/Cloud-based compute power for larger problems and faster turn-around. The details of the project so far (it started last Summer and is now in Round 2) can be read at these two links:

http://www.digitalmanufacturingreport.com/dmr/2012-12-07/cae_experiment_provides_insight_into_computing_as_a_service.html

http://www.hpcwire.com/hpcwire/2012-12-10/hpc_as_a_service:_lessons_learned.html

We are particularly interested in reaching out to more workstation/desktop-level simulation engineers (end users) to take part in Round 3. I am hoping that DesignNews can mention this effort and provide a link to one/both of the above e-articles.  Wolfgang Gentzsch, an acknowledged global expert on grid/cloud computing and co-founder of the HPC Experiment, is also interested in writing a more detailed article for DesignNews on the purpose and results, so far, of the Experiment.

Please feel free to contact me (dennis.nagy@hpcexperiment.com) or Wolfgang directly (wolfgang.gentzsch@hpcexperiment.com) for more details.

 

tekochip
User Rank
Platinum
Open Source
tekochip   3/25/2013 1:57:03 PM
NO RATINGS
I'm not a real fan of open source. The open source compilers that I've used would get the job done, but were terribly inefficient. I sat down and looked and the object code and wondered why the compiler was loading one register to pass it to another register, push it on the stack, pop it off the stack and then test the bit you were looking for in the first place. Yes, it's open source and I could modify it to suit my needs, but I would just rather buy the right tool for my project rather than building my own. In a mechanical vein; I could build my own drill press with the motor, chuck and stand that I bought open source, or I could just buy a drill press, drill the hole I needed and continue on with a single project rather than working on two projects.


Partner Zone
More Blogs from Sponsored Blogs
Nowadays, when changes are required its hard to beat the capabilities and power that were accustomed to with a modern computer workstation.
With demanding professional applications that require more power each year, engineers and designers need to keep up and stay productive.
Technology can go a long way toward helping people at all levels in manufacturing, and this list of technologies and solutions can help the manufacturing industry.
The next time you're churning through simulation models, manipulating 3D designs in real-time, or rendering a beautiful photo-realistic image, take a moment to think about all the work that goes on behind the scenes and be glad you don't have to worry about it.
Workstations are high-performance computers that are used for the most intensive computing tasks, such as creative design and engineering, computer modeling and analysis, and animation.
Design News Webinar Series
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Sep 22 - 26, MCU Software Development A Step-by-Step Guide (Using a Real Eval Board)
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: September 30 - October 2
Sponsored by Altera
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service