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Video: BallCam Puts Football Fans on the Field
3/5/2013

The BallCam is capable of editing out the spinning of the football and providing a usable image.   (Source: Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute)
The BallCam is capable of editing out the spinning of the football and providing a usable image.
(Source: Carnegie Mellon Robotics Institute)

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Charles Murray
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Re: video capture rate is more than adequate for moving forward
Charles Murray   3/6/2013 9:57:56 PM
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I also wonder how good the sky-detecting algorithm would be at night, Dave.

Charles Murray
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Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
Charles Murray   3/6/2013 9:55:56 PM
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You're right, bkcTN. The technology for calling balls and strikes is available right now. Baseball is a little more stodgy about change, though. It would probably take an act of Congress to get the MLB to make that kind of change.

Charles Murray
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Re: Ballcam and the kickoff.
Charles Murray   3/6/2013 9:53:00 PM
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Another intersting thing about kickoffs, William K, is that the researchers said they would need two cameras inside the ball instead of one. Evidently, the end-over-end motion of a kickoff is too much for one camera to handle.

William K.
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Ballcam and the kickoff.
William K.   3/6/2013 9:29:32 PM
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Can you immagine the impact from watching the kickers foot come at the ball at the kickoff, or for the extra point?Suddenly this huge foot approaches and then WHAM! Probably a few couch potato injuries from that image.

marty48
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Put a camera in both ends...
marty48   3/6/2013 9:14:36 PM
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... so the quarterback doesn't need to be a cameraman.

Rocketplumber
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Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
Rocketplumber   3/6/2013 4:58:05 PM
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Yes, an unstable landing can return interesting video, provided the camera is tough. Armadillo Aerospace provided a great example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNuCiFGU0jM

robatnorcross
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Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
robatnorcross   3/6/2013 4:31:33 PM
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The main reason I LIKE soccer and DESPISE baseball, football, basketball is the continuous replays, standing around of the players, talking (yelling) of the coaches, measuring the lines, etc. that manage to turn a 15 minute game into a 2 hours of mind numbing boredome.

Now they will have even more things to replays (from the in-ball camera) to show us to make the game even more boring.

I can only pray that NO govt. money was spent developing this.

bkcTN
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Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
bkcTN   3/6/2013 2:43:56 PM
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Well, while we are talking practical applications in unecessary events such as sports, why in the world do we not use technology to accurately and consistently call strikes in baseball?  Obviously, that technology has existed for decades and hasn't been used either.  And, yet we have "instant" replay in football?

And, I apologize for not getting down to the part that contained the 60 fps.  I think I saw the video and the bright, shiny video caught my eye.

Dave Palmer
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Re: video capture rate is more than adequate for moving forward
Dave Palmer   3/6/2013 2:04:26 PM
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@bkcTN: According to the article, the capture rate is 60 fps.  This would give a useable frame rate of about 15 - 30 fps.  It wouldn't take too much to bring it up to 24 fps for television.

I wonder how robust the "sky-detecting" algorithm is.  I'm guessing it wouldn't work very well during Bears-Packers games in the snow.

Ryder
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Re: video capture rate is more than adequate for moving forward
Ryder   3/6/2013 2:02:08 PM
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The Hero3 does 120 fps already... in 720p... a very cheap consumer level solution.

You could EASILY double or triple that framerate for a commercial application.
It could probably stitch the data inside the ball in real time, and transmit LIVE for that matter... it might even calculate "tweens" on the fly and insert that into the datastream.

 

 

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