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Correction Technique Adds 'Warmth' to Dimmable LED Light
1/15/2013

Using a correction technique, NXP engineers say they can produce a dimmable LED color that lies between amber and white.   (Source: NXP Semiconductors)
Using a correction technique, NXP engineers say they can produce a dimmable LED color that lies between amber and white.
(Source: NXP Semiconductors)

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Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/18/2013 11:46:44 AM
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I have light-sensitive eyes, too, as well as light spectrum sensitive. I wear dark glasses in sunlight and sometimes on cloudy days, too. Whether there's a connection between those hadn't occurred to me. Interesting question.

Charles Murray
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:38:58 PM
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I agree, William K. When I'm working -- by that I mean reading and writing -- I want frosty white light. Light preference depends on the application.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/18/2013 5:42:06 PM
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Good point, Ann. Many of the old-fashioned fluorescent bulbs gave off the same, weird greenish glow.

William K.
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/18/2013 9:11:37 PM
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The wonderful thing is that we live in a free country and we don't have to be all the same. Of course some stores that I have seen would not give that impresion. Why should I have only one choice, that of "warm white" light? Is nobody brave enough to offere a product other than what marketing has decided is what the masses will be offered?

mrdon
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
mrdon   1/20/2013 8:04:26 PM
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William K, I agree. I was always curious about the number of customers wanting warm color lighting versus the cool look while developing LED light kits for Hunter Fans. I personally like white light while working in the lab and at my desk. White light makes desktop and wall surfaces brighter for seeing small color bands on resistors and IC part numbers. Here's a video of the NXP demo presented at this years CES conference. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRieORS6g1w&feature=youtu.be

William K.
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/21/2013 8:27:58 PM
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The "you tube" light demonstration was interesting, and it looks like they have done well in emulating an incandescent light bulb. They are half way there. Now all that is needed is a means to control the whiteness of the light independantly of the intensity. Perhaps they never thought about that option.

Of course, by emulating the light bulb they did avoid having to add more wires. I am probably one of the very few who would be quite willing to revise my wiring to support more flexible colors of lighting. Of course, being qualified, willing, and able is a rare thing in this day and age.

Jack Rupert, PE
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
Jack Rupert, PE   1/26/2013 5:30:25 PM
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Unfortunately, William K. you are only partially correct.  This wouldn't even be such an important discussion if we were allowed to choose the lighting type we wanted based on color, preference, costing, efficiency or whatever is most important to the individual.  However, the free market was stepped on with others telling us what those priorities should be...and which "better mousetrap" we HAVE to buy.

William K.
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Re: "warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/26/2013 8:43:41 PM
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Jack, it seems that you are correct. I forgot about our legislative body's decisions that were made based on all of those emotions. They seldom let reason and intellect interfere with their process, and so now we are stuch with that pale orange glow lighting.

Forgive me, I was thinking rationally. I hope that the lighting police are not on their way just yet.

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/28/2013 12:12:21 PM
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It's not just the old-fashioned fluorescent bulbs that have that awful greenish glow but also the CFLs--those were the ones I was referring to. I agree with William K--there should be variety and choice, not only for different people, but for different uses. The cold white light of LEDs is great for seeing fine details.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   2/4/2013 7:31:46 PM
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Yes, choice is good, Ann. I have a cold white LED bulb in my office. About a year ago, I unscrewed it and replaced it with an incandescent.

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