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World's Smallest Reed Switch Makes Technology Easier to Swallow

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Pubudu
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Re: Really cool, but expensive
Pubudu   2/21/2014 7:41:12 AM
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Very true elizebath I also do agree with you on this. It's worth paying a premium price if the product is really a good rather than taking a risk with a low price, specially when it comes to an health care product.

Pubudu
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Re: Really cool, but expensive
Pubudu   2/21/2014 7:52:13 AM
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Yes a2, price comes to second place for sure, and when we talk about quality it should be illustrated through the every access such as quality, accuracy etc.......

Charles Murray
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Re: Really cool, but expensive
Charles Murray   2/21/2014 3:40:42 PM
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Yes, a2, I think that the applications mentioned here are appropriate due to necessity. They are definitely high-end, and most applications don't call for a reed switch that costs several dollars. As the price goes down, though, the number of applications will rise.

JimT@Future-Product-Innovations
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Re: Really cool, but expensive
JimT@Future-Product-Innovations   2/26/2014 1:25:09 PM
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On the issue of cost, MEMS fabrication methods are always that high (and even higher) at inception, but will fall fast based on the huge volume potential.  I can easily envision this at $1 in the very near future. But I see a possible drawback in the intended application.  Reed switches are by nature, 'vicinity' switches.  They are activated when magnetic field comes close to them. Once swallowed, it is going to get 'out-of-vicinity' of a passing magnet.   I suppose if the design-intent is to swallow a switch (within whatever host device) and then undergo a powerful MRI, I could see the switch activating.  But a more conventional handheld magnetic actuator, such as a pace-maker programmer for example, would have to output a substantially higher magnetic field than is presently achieved to activate the switch, assuming its resident within the bowels of the digestive tract.  That's pretty deep.

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