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Video: BallCam Puts Football Fans on the Field

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Pubudu
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Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
Pubudu   3/6/2013 12:18:08 PM
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Interesting article Charls

But I cannot identify, or think about the practical application for these. Or is it only for fun.

Ryder
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Silver
Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
Ryder   3/6/2013 1:55:01 PM
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As there is no "practical application" for the entire sport of football, then it's probably the perfect fit :)  Practical application is not necessary in any multi-billion dollar industry that has no practical basis in the first place.

 

But for any circumstance where uncontrolled changes of orientation occur, all this really is about is image stabilization, and in that sense, image stabilization is a significant issue already.


It's now standard in most video cameras.


But let's say that you had a tumbling spacecraft approaching a planet surface.  You could spend millions stabilizing the craft... or you could simply let it tumble.  If you wanted to image the surface on the way down and perhaps make a terrain map for later exploration... a fast camera and some software is a much cheaper and lighter way to go.

A camera in a bullet might allow the bullet be visually guided.

Anti-tank bombs that spin for stability could use it for visual targeting.

Remotely operated flying vehicles that don't require a stable body become practical (imagine rotors fixed to a cylindrical payload... no bearings or rotation)

etc. etc...

 

 

 

Ryder
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Silver
Re: video capture rate is more than adequate for moving forward
Ryder   3/6/2013 2:02:08 PM
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The Hero3 does 120 fps already... in 720p... a very cheap consumer level solution.

You could EASILY double or triple that framerate for a commercial application.
It could probably stitch the data inside the ball in real time, and transmit LIVE for that matter... it might even calculate "tweens" on the fly and insert that into the datastream.

 

 

Dave Palmer
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Re: video capture rate is more than adequate for moving forward
Dave Palmer   3/6/2013 2:04:26 PM
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@bkcTN: According to the article, the capture rate is 60 fps.  This would give a useable frame rate of about 15 - 30 fps.  It wouldn't take too much to bring it up to 24 fps for television.

I wonder how robust the "sky-detecting" algorithm is.  I'm guessing it wouldn't work very well during Bears-Packers games in the snow.

bkcTN
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Iron
Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
bkcTN   3/6/2013 2:43:56 PM
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Well, while we are talking practical applications in unecessary events such as sports, why in the world do we not use technology to accurately and consistently call strikes in baseball?  Obviously, that technology has existed for decades and hasn't been used either.  And, yet we have "instant" replay in football?

And, I apologize for not getting down to the part that contained the 60 fps.  I think I saw the video and the bright, shiny video caught my eye.

robatnorcross
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Gold
Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
robatnorcross   3/6/2013 4:31:33 PM
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The main reason I LIKE soccer and DESPISE baseball, football, basketball is the continuous replays, standing around of the players, talking (yelling) of the coaches, measuring the lines, etc. that manage to turn a 15 minute game into a 2 hours of mind numbing boredome.

Now they will have even more things to replays (from the in-ball camera) to show us to make the game even more boring.

I can only pray that NO govt. money was spent developing this.

Rocketplumber
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Iron
Re: Cameras in other rotating objects
Rocketplumber   3/6/2013 4:58:05 PM
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Yes, an unstable landing can return interesting video, provided the camera is tough. Armadillo Aerospace provided a great example:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BNuCiFGU0jM

marty48
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Iron
Put a camera in both ends...
marty48   3/6/2013 9:14:36 PM
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... so the quarterback doesn't need to be a cameraman.

William K.
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Platinum
Ballcam and the kickoff.
William K.   3/6/2013 9:29:32 PM
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Can you immagine the impact from watching the kickers foot come at the ball at the kickoff, or for the extra point?Suddenly this huge foot approaches and then WHAM! Probably a few couch potato injuries from that image.

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Re: Ballcam and the kickoff.
Charles Murray   3/6/2013 9:53:00 PM
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Another intersting thing about kickoffs, William K, is that the researchers said they would need two cameras inside the ball instead of one. Evidently, the end-over-end motion of a kickoff is too much for one camera to handle.

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