HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Electronic News & Comment

Bill Gates Funds 'Big Battery' Startup

NO RATINGS
Page 1 / 2 Next >
View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
<<  <  Page 2/6  >  >>
vimalkumarp
User Rank
Gold
battery
vimalkumarp   12/14/2011 9:26:06 AM
NO RATINGS
Since  solar and wind are intermittent this will be a great boost to the efforts for finding soultions to the energy problem

Nick
User Rank
Iron
Re: What's so hard about battery technology?
Nick   12/14/2011 9:39:34 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm far from a battery expert, but my belief is that the substances known to be suitable to build a battery simply don't have the capacity to develop electrical energy for truly long periods.  Think of what is required - regardless of whether we're talking energy storage for wind, or solar, you'd better be able to provide a clean 7-days' worth of electrical energy at advertised output, and those substances simply don't exist currently.

Researchers in Germany are currently working on a battery which shows promise, but a practical prototype is still a few years away.  I don't believe that there's a, "conspiricy theory" at work, because the first one to, "reach the finish line" stands to make a big pile of jack.  Once the final barriers are broken, among other things, you'll see a subsequent, rapid de-centralization of electrical energy generation, because consumers will embrace these technologies.

I've checked into doing something for my family, and truthfully, I need to come up with at least $25,000.00 - $30,000.00 to generate a scant 12-KW reliably.  Payback is well-past 25-years, so guess what?  I'm reluctantly sticking with the electrical energy utility in our area.

 

Thanks.

davidwheath
User Rank
Iron
Re: What's so hard about battery technology?
davidwheath   12/14/2011 9:50:24 AM
NO RATINGS
Whole-heartedly agree. Too bad we can't change human behavior. Everyone wants more, bigger/smaller, and faster and they want it yesterday. Nevermind the fact we don't need or use it. And I include myself in that behavior as well.

davidwheath
User Rank
Iron
Re: What's so hard about battery technology?
davidwheath   12/14/2011 10:05:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Do you complain when you have to refuel your car before reaching your destination? Maybe you find it inconvenient to eat more than once a week. Batteries have come a long way, but can't keep up with the demands and wants of the people. I've had this discussion several times.

sensor pro
User Rank
Gold
Re: What's so hard about battery technology?
sensor pro   12/14/2011 10:06:42 AM
NO RATINGS
I think it is very positive move on his part to invest into something as practical as this. Clearly we need serious investment to try and find a solution to portable power.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Temperature makes it interesting
TJ McDermott   12/14/2011 10:11:05 AM
NO RATINGS
The battery's operating temperature is 550 C.  So, to start the battery, it's got to be heated first.  Once there, is its operation self-supporting - does it keep itself heated?

wbswenberg
User Rank
Gold
Big Battery
wbswenberg   12/14/2011 10:19:58 AM
NO RATINGS
I'm sorry any one that has an RV out in the woods understands capacity vs use rate - without a generator.  The other thing people don't understand is a discharged battery vs a depleted battery.  Battery capacity declines with age and use.  For my battery operated electronics I have rechargables and primaries.  It is a life style.  Cycle the discharged batteries through the charger.  The primaries are backups when the rechargables fail and they will.  And at some point they all die permanently.  I worked on MinuteMan silos for the MX missile.  I studied the electrical grid, diesel electric backup generator, lead acid secondaries and primaries.  You match the end of life capacity with the desired use rate.  It is just that simple.  For stationary power there are little worries.  It is the mobile applications that are hard.  Where volume and weight have big effects.  But we had electric cars since the 1900's, right.  Just build inexpensive electric cars.  It is the initial cost that is prohibitive.  I only have a 24 mile commute (round trip) with only a five mile stretch (both ways) of forced high speed.  The rest is 35 mph.  I don't need blue tooth, web, and all that other crap.  Mpg, maintenance, reliability, and cost is what it is all about.

deleola
User Rank
Iron
Why not tap megawatt of discharges from thunderstorm
deleola   12/14/2011 10:46:15 AM
NO RATINGS
Each time there is a release of charges in the atmosphere, megawatt of energy is released. What can we build a storage tank for this type of energy?

RNDDUDE
User Rank
Platinum
Re: Big batteries can only benefit from big backer
RNDDUDE   12/14/2011 10:46:35 AM
I applaud any and all battery research, but why can't we get some major funding for a proven energy storage technology: Kinetic Energy via the use of high-speed flywheels? It is a proven concept, it has very good storage capability, it is environmentally low-impact, and it can be scaled easily.

bdcst
User Rank
Platinum
Fuel Cells Anyone?
bdcst   12/14/2011 10:57:12 AM
NO RATINGS
As long as you are going to run very hot batteries, why not improve upon fuel cells?  True, they are far more complex and expensive today, but with improved design and mass production they could become economically feasible.  You need three elements, a fuel generator driven by electricity, a storage system and finally the fuel cell battery to reverse the process.  One benefit of fuel cell technology is the ability to "burn" multiple fuels.  The other is the ability to supplement the renewable fuel source with purchased fuel for those times where renewable sources of electricity may be in short supply.

For electric locomotion fuel cell batteries can be recharged in a couple of minutes, just like internal combustion engines, by filling the fuel tank.  Storage batteries cannot be recharged as rapidly.  And hairbrained schemes to mimic  conveniently short pit stops revolve around swapping out whole thousand pound battery packs at the refueling station.

This is not pie in the sky as there have been hydrogen powered electric busses in service in some cities.

<<  <  Page 2/6  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Electronic News & Comment
Melissa Cavanagh of 3DP Unlimited talked to Design News about the company’s large format 3D printer, during Medical Design and Manufacturing Midwest.
Eric Doster of iFixit talks about the most surprising aspect of the Microsoft Surface Pro 3 teardown. In a presentation at Medical Design & Manufacturing Midwest, iFixit gave the Surface Pro 3 a score of one (out of a possible 10) for repairability.
Time was when a talented driver with a manual transmission could beat any car with an automatic transmission in a straight-line race. No more, though. In tests at GM’s Milford Proving Grounds near Detroit, the 2015 Chevy Corvette Z06 equipped with an automatic has turned 0-60 mph times of 2.95 seconds, making it about a quarter of a second faster than the same vehicle with a manual trans.
If there’s a microcontroller-based Web server in your future, then you’ll want to take note of an upcoming Design News Continuing Education Center class, "How to Build An Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial.”
More than 100 million viewers will see the Super Bowl in a new light in 2015, as the game is illuminated for the first time by light-emitting diodes.
Design News Webinar Series
10/7/2014 8:00 a.m. California / 11:00 a.m. New York
9/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
9/10/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Oct 20 - 24, How to Design & Build an Embedded Web Server: An Embedded TCP/IP Tutorial
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 11:00 AM
Sponsored by Stratasys
Next Class: 10/28-10/30 2:00 PM
Sponsored by Gates Corporation
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service