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Ethernet for Vehicles Advances

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Beth Stackpole
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Re: Reservations around Ethernet?
Beth Stackpole   12/16/2011 7:27:47 AM
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Makes perfect sense. Thanks for clarifying, Chuck. Luckily for me, I use a Mac so I've never encountered the dreaded "blue screen" <grin>, but I can imagine that the possibility of dealing with any kind of unknown or security breach is too risky especially for power train applications that have such a close correlation to driver safety. Question though: Were there specific advances around Ethernet that drove up its level of determinism?

williamlweaver
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Re: Reservations around Ethernet?
williamlweaver   12/16/2011 9:01:13 AM
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Perish the thought that a critical Real-Time system would be using a general purpose office OS such as Windows. Modern Real-Time data acquisition and control systems are extremely reliable. For example National Instruments LabVIEW RT (real time) is a very mature product and has embedded solutions and even a real-time hypervisor for running multiple RT instances in parallel. I don't think the BSOD is the fault of the Ethernet communication standard. 

Ann R. Thryft
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Re: Reservations around Ethernet?
Ann R. Thryft   12/16/2011 11:19:18 AM
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I'd love to think that there'd be less wiring, but I find that a bit tough to believe. I think that williamlweaver has it right: the whole system has to be redesigned from the bottom up if we're going to make such a radical shift as moving to a drive-by-wire Ethernet.


Charles Murray
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Re: Reservations around Ethernet?
Charles Murray   12/16/2011 5:47:19 PM
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You're probably right, Ann. Wiring bundles are going to continue to be an issue for the foreseeable future. Still, all the automakers know something will need to be done eventually. It's kind of like of like building up deabt on your credit card. At some point, you've gotta pay the piper.

davidwheath
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Iron
re: Ethernet
davidwheath   12/20/2011 7:31:55 AM
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I'm a PE in electronics (15 years) and have nothing against technology, but I think this is ridiculous. It's a good example how we apply technology to something that doesn't need it. It does the driver no good, except for complacency while driving, which I'm very against. All the entertainment, cameras and navigation are not needed. Neither is drive-by-wire. Auto manufactures embrace it because it adds complexity to the vehicle. Complexity means more money from specialized equipment, training and perception of value. Why let a small garage repair a problem, when we could force the owner to take to dealer and force the dealer to pay for new equipment and training.. Of course, most people get rid of a vehicle as soon as the warranty expires anyway, so I guess repair cost wouldn't be a factor. I know I'm ranting, but it upsets me that we put so much effort into something that doesn't need it when the areas that do need revamped take a back seat. Example, why does it still take 3 business days for a check to clear a national bank? 

Jack Rupert, PE
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Platinum
re: Ethernet
Jack Rupert, PE   12/23/2011 4:34:18 PM
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David, I agree with you on the entertainment "features" in cars, however, not so much on some of the rest of the electronics.  I've got an old car, but a portable navigation system (i.e., GPS).  When I'm going some place new, I still like my maps, but as soon as you hit a snag you've got problems.  When a road is closed, you miss an exit, you can't read a road sign, or whatever, it sure helps get you back on track without having to try to figure out where you are.  As far as the 15 cameras are concerned, yes, that's excessive, but one on the bumper to let you back up far enough, but not too far is a good thing.  (Not that I have that on my current vehicle...)

Ann R. Thryft
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re: Ethernet
Ann R. Thryft   12/29/2011 11:52:46 AM
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To me, GPS assistance is the only new thing in car electronics that I find useful. But even that has problems, especially in the more remote areas like the one where I live. The problem is simply that, while the GPS function may work just fine, the maps are often wrong because no one's actually come out here and driven the roads. They can also be wrong for different reasons in major cities, where roads change more frequently.

 

 

 

Charles Murray
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re: Ethernet
Charles Murray   1/3/2012 9:53:00 PM
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I don't dislike GPS, but I've grown less trustful of it over the years. When it gets confused, it declares, "recalculating," after which it demands that the driver make sudden, unexpected changes. I've had numerous situations in which GPS les me astray, including this one:

http://www.designnews.com/author.asp?section_id=1386&doc_id=226342

Ann R. Thryft
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re: Ethernet
Ann R. Thryft   1/4/2012 12:48:25 PM
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Chuck, that sounds pretty bad, indeed. And I remember hearing similar stories from some of my friends with in-car GPS systems back then in 2007. But haven't GPS systems improved much since that article was written?


Charles Murray
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re: Ethernet
Charles Murray   1/4/2012 1:23:49 PM
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The key is the databases. GPS is only as good as its databases. And, yes, they're definitely improving. That said, I went back to the same Connecticut location in 2009 and stayed at the same hotel. Again, I rented a GPS system for the vehicle. This time -- I swear I am not making this up -- the GPS led me to a nearby cemetery and told me it was my destination.  

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