HOME  |  NEWS  |  BLOGS  |  MESSAGES  |  FEATURES  |  VIDEOS  |  WEBINARS  |  INDUSTRIES  |  FOCUS ON FUNDAMENTALS
  |  REGISTER  |  LOGIN  |  HELP
Blogs
Electronic News & Comment
Correction Technique Adds 'Warmth' to Dimmable LED Light
1/15/2013

Using a correction technique, NXP engineers say they can produce a dimmable LED color that lies between amber and white.   (Source: NXP Semiconductors)
Using a correction technique, NXP engineers say they can produce a dimmable LED color that lies between amber and white.
(Source: NXP Semiconductors)

Return to Article

View Comments: Oldest First|Newest First|Threaded View
Page 1/3  >  >>
Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/15/2013 5:13:07 AM
NO RATINGS
This is a great innovation. I personally try to use more energy efficient light bulbs but am one of the people that doesn't like that harsh light--I prefer dim lamp lighting or candles to the "hospital white" mentioned in the article. If I and others like me could have the best of both worlds this would really catch on.

naperlou
User Rank
Blogger
Engineered innovation
naperlou   1/15/2013 10:08:03 AM
NO RATINGS
Chuck, this is a good example of an engineered innovation.  By putting together these three aspects of the LED lighting they are able to come up with something that consumers actually want.  Unlike older lighting technologies, LED lighting is more highly engineered.  There are a lot mote parameters that can be controlled.

TJ McDermott
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
TJ McDermott   1/15/2013 12:10:25 PM
NO RATINGS
Elizabeth, I agree - I much prefer the warm yellow light offered by incandescents.  I look forward to this technique being offered in the very near future.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/15/2013 12:12:12 PM
NO RATINGS
This is potential good news for those of us who are sensitive to light color--not everyone is, it turns out. Those greenish CFLs make everyone look like zombies to me, and harsh LEDs give me a headache. But NXP's Surdeanu needs a history lesson: we're used to the warm light of the sun and firelight after a few million--not a thousand--years. And that's what natural spectrum lights are all about--they emphasize the reds we're wired for.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/16/2013 7:11:36 AM
NO RATINGS
Indeed, Ann, a bit of a history lesson is necessary...I guess I never thought about why many humans are so adverse to harsh light but it certainly makes sense! Not to mention the associations with bright white lighting (hospitals, as mentioned, and to me they also remind me of unpleasant days in a school room!). What is it exactly that makes some of us sensitive to light color and others not so much, do you know?

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/16/2013 12:16:55 PM
NO RATINGS
The history lesson I was referring to was the unit of millions, not a thousand, years: just a few orders of magnitude, that's all! Re what makes some of us more sensitive to colored light than others, I don't know and I'm not sure it's been looked into. There are many variations like that among humans that haven't been studied much. If anyone does know about this one, I'm interested in learning.

Charles Murray
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Charles Murray   1/16/2013 7:42:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Good point, Ann. a similar phenomena can happen with LEDs. NXP told me that if you don't correct for temperature, an LED can give off a pink-ish or blue-ish light.

Ann R. Thryft
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Ann R. Thryft   1/17/2013 1:02:39 PM
NO RATINGS
It's funny, LEDs don't bug me nearly as much. Greenish CFL light makes people look like zombies and I actually find it depressing and/or nauseating. But warm colors are a lot better--that's part of what makes natural spectrum bulbs so efficient in raising mood and lowering blood pressure for some of us.The problem I have with LEDs is they're so harsh--they give me eyestrain pretty quickly.

Elizabeth M
User Rank
Blogger
Re: Great innovation
Elizabeth M   1/17/2013 2:55:12 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, for sure, I'd like to know as well. For me, I have been tested to have very light-sensitive eyes in general (I've been a contact lense wearer for 30 years, though I'm not sure that has anything to do with it). I'm not sure if light sensitivity has anything to do with light-spectrum sensitivity in particular, though. Perhaps a Google search is in order! Will report back any pertinent findings...

William K.
User Rank
Platinum
"warmth" added to led lights.
William K.   1/17/2013 8:30:10 PM
NO RATINGS
IT is fine for some folks to prefer the cave-like dim glow, but please don't assume that everybody likes that effect. I have always liked the more frosty white type of light because it allows for seeing things, especially details, much more clearly. The biggest problem that I see right now with LED lighting is the incorrect assumption that everybody likes and must have that yellowish cast light, and that nobody would ever like the frosty white illumination. 

But fads come and go and in a while there will be a different shade of light in favor. That is the way things change, and the way that they have been for quite a while.

The other thingthat I see is that for quite a few general illumination applications tere is really no need to make all of the lights exactly the same color spectrum. So there would be a real market for those devices that did not fit into the very narrow bins that seem to be keeping the price of devices higher than they really need to be. How about offering us a line of lights that have a braoder spread of colors, and aloso a lower price. It could be a benefit to a lot of us.

Page 1/3  >  >>
Partner Zone
More Blogs from Electronic News & Comment
Self-driving vehicle technology could grow rapidly over the next two decades, with nearly 95 million “autonomous-capable” cars being sold annually around the world by 2035, a new study predicts.
From pitchers and forwards to quarterbacks and defensemen, we offer a peek at some of the more memorable engineers in sports history.
The recent decision by the German parliament to consider a move back to typewriters may serve as a lesson, not only in the need for secure products, but also in the dangers of overdesign.
In the muscular tradition of the rubber-burning dragsters of the 1960s, start-up company Bloodshed Motors plans to put a new twist on the decades-old concept of the performance car.
Mentor Graphics acquisition of XS Embedded GmbH last week could be meaningful for automotive electronics engineers, potentially enabling them to accelerate design and verification of products ranging from infotainment packages to autonomous safety systems.
Design News Webinar Series
7/23/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
7/17/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
6/25/2014 11:00 a.m. California / 2:00 p.m. New York
5/13/2014 10:00 a.m. California / 1:00 p.m. New York / 6:00 p.m. London
Quick Poll
The Continuing Education Center offers engineers an entirely new way to get the education they need to formulate next-generation solutions.
Aug 4 - 8, Introduction to Linux Device Drivers
SEMESTERS: 1  |  2  |  3  |  4  |  5  |  6


Focus on Fundamentals consists of 45-minute on-line classes that cover a host of technologies. You learn without leaving the comfort of your desk. All classes are taught by subject-matter experts and all are archived. So if you can't attend live, attend at your convenience.
Next Class: August 12 - 14
Sponsored by igus
Learn More   |   Login   |   Archived Classes
Twitter Feed
Design News Twitter Feed
Like Us on Facebook

Sponsored Content

Technology Marketplace

Copyright © 2014 UBM Canon, A UBM company, All rights reserved. Privacy Policy | Terms of Service