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Do You Really Need 4 GB of RAM to Type a Letter?

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Ratsky
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In my case....
Ratsky   8/5/2014 3:49:48 PM
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... since my employer blocks nearly all social sites (including even LinkedIn), my timewaster is posting on Design News blogs.....

Elizabeth M
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Re: OVERDESIGN
Elizabeth M   8/5/2014 6:02:16 AM
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See my previous comment, Chuck. I think a lot of people would agree with you and I think MSFT should've kept the base of XP for all future OSes and just updated as technological advances demanded.

Elizabeth M
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Re: OVERDESIGN
Elizabeth M   8/5/2014 6:01:11 AM
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I used to write about Microsoft as a tech journalist in a past life. ;) And one of the things we talked about a lot then, and it's still true, I think, that XP is the best Windows OS MSFT ever made, and really, none have been as good since then. For them to drop support is asinine, in my opinion. Vista took too long and too much money to develop and wasn't all that great anyway, and the others that have followed aren't anything special, either. I mean, sure there are some improvements and newer technologies, but maybe they just should have kept updating XP over the years with new features instead of reinventing the wheel. Just my opinion!

tekochip
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Re: Interesting concept
tekochip   8/4/2014 12:27:26 PM
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Very well said Elizabeth!

Charles Murray
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Re: OVERDESIGN
Charles Murray   8/1/2014 12:20:56 PM
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I felt the same about Windows XP, bobjengr. I finally had to move on because of new-app compatibility issues and because of security fears. Windows 7 gave me nothing new that I really needed. It just wasted a lot of my time.  

bobjengr
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OVERDESIGN
bobjengr   7/26/2014 2:51:09 PM
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During my university days I had a machine design professor (Dr. Robert Maxwell) who said: "an under-design can be catastrophic, an over design is just plain dumb." One case in point for me is Windows XP and the fact that Microsoft is dropping their support.  XP is a just exactly what I need for the work I do--no more, no less.  I don't need the added bells and whistles "more advanced" systems offer and possibly provide.  More capable systems are just distractions as noted.  The Internet can be a black hole relative to wasting time and surfing. 

 Germany is moving to more secure systems due to the significant loss of privacy and the fact that digital systems can and probably will be hacked during the lifetime of the equipment.    I feel everyone has a right to privacy and the public needs to know what I choose to tell them. 

a2
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Gold
Re: ceylons
a2   7/24/2014 2:47:13 AM
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@ceylons: Well that shows what movies can do for you. Technology is being evolved around imagination. 

patb2009
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ceylons
patb2009   7/24/2014 12:28:09 AM
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If anyone here saw the Reboot of Battlestar Galactica, the ceylons were computerized,

and any sophisticated tech made it more likely that they could attack it, so the human

response was minimum tech.

 

 

Charles Murray
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Interesting side note
Charles Murray   7/22/2014 6:23:46 PM
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An interesting side note: The typewriter shown in the photo has a transparent enclosure. This style is often used in prisons because the transparent body prevents typists from storing contraband inside the machine.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Interesting concept
Elizabeth M   7/22/2014 6:02:52 AM
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You're right, Chuck. While it's a good idea to give people only what they need, it's also more complicated. Homogenization always wins because, as you point out, it's not only simpler, it also comes with a better price tag.

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