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Do You Really Need 4 GB of RAM to Type a Letter?

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bobjengr
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OVERDESIGN
bobjengr   7/26/2014 2:51:09 PM
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During my university days I had a machine design professor (Dr. Robert Maxwell) who said: "an under-design can be catastrophic, an over design is just plain dumb." One case in point for me is Windows XP and the fact that Microsoft is dropping their support.  XP is a just exactly what I need for the work I do--no more, no less.  I don't need the added bells and whistles "more advanced" systems offer and possibly provide.  More capable systems are just distractions as noted.  The Internet can be a black hole relative to wasting time and surfing. 

 Germany is moving to more secure systems due to the significant loss of privacy and the fact that digital systems can and probably will be hacked during the lifetime of the equipment.    I feel everyone has a right to privacy and the public needs to know what I choose to tell them. 

a2
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Gold
Re: ceylons
a2   7/24/2014 2:47:13 AM
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@ceylons: Well that shows what movies can do for you. Technology is being evolved around imagination. 

patb2009
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Gold
ceylons
patb2009   7/24/2014 12:28:09 AM
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If anyone here saw the Reboot of Battlestar Galactica, the ceylons were computerized,

and any sophisticated tech made it more likely that they could attack it, so the human

response was minimum tech.

 

 

Charles Murray
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Blogger
Interesting side note
Charles Murray   7/22/2014 6:23:46 PM
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An interesting side note: The typewriter shown in the photo has a transparent enclosure. This style is often used in prisons because the transparent body prevents typists from storing contraband inside the machine.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Interesting concept
Elizabeth M   7/22/2014 6:02:52 AM
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You're right, Chuck. While it's a good idea to give people only what they need, it's also more complicated. Homogenization always wins because, as you point out, it's not only simpler, it also comes with a better price tag.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Interesting concept
Elizabeth M   7/22/2014 6:02:20 AM
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You're right, Chuck. While it's a good idea to give people only what they need, it's also more complicated. Homogenization always wins because, as you point out, it's not only simpler, it also comes with a better price tag.

Charles Murray
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Re: Interesting concept
Charles Murray   7/21/2014 6:19:20 PM
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Liz, your suggestion is the sensible one -- give them the right machine for what they need to do. That said, I think economies of scale will win out. A general purpose machine will usually be cheaper...unfortunately.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Interesting concept
Elizabeth M   7/21/2014 4:42:06 AM
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Daniyal, you have outlined in a really clear way exactly what I meant in my post. Everyone gets the machine equivalent to what they need to do. There was some talk of doing this with computer OSes in terms of permissions to applications, but still that required giving people the whole computer. I think giving people devices equal to what they need to do their jobs--for example, some people might just need smartphones--is the best way to go. I feel like it would be a massive cultural adjustment, though--some people might not know what to do without sitting in front of an actual computer screen!

far911
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Silver
Re: Interesting concept
far911   7/20/2014 12:56:09 AM
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It reminds me of my office routine also.

Nancy Golden
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Platinum
Re: Interesting concept
Nancy Golden   7/19/2014 10:54:10 AM
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Good for you Charles - continue to use the force and resist the temptation of smart phone internet connections or you will indeed find yourself on the dark side!

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