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Slideshow: 25 Greatest Engineering Quotes

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Charles Murray
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Herbert Hoover
Charles Murray   3/10/2014 7:03:45 PM
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I've gone through most of the comments and it appears no one commented on Herbert Hoover's quote about engineering being a great profession. Here it is, 80 years later, and people still aren't listening to Hoover.

a.saji
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Re: Great Engineering Quotes
a.saji   3/7/2014 3:57:24 AM
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@rossloeb: Yes indeed and that is why there are so many differences in thinking. They way one sees on things is way too different from the other. That is why there are so many alternatives to cater each and everyone’s requirement.

Charles Murray
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Re: Pi
Charles Murray   3/6/2014 7:34:27 PM
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Agreed, JMS3D printing. Ten is sufficiently precise for most engineering problems. When I first got into engineering, the older engineers used to look at the calculators of the younger engineers (who liked to carry out their calculations to three decimal places) and just shake their heads.

Charles Murray
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Re: Great Engineering Quotes
Charles Murray   2/5/2014 8:48:49 PM
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I like it, rossloeb. Here's a similarly funny engineering quote that we didn't use. It's from from Henry Albert Ben (maybe someone can tell me who he is):  "Hell must be isothermal; for otherwise the resident engineers and physical chemists (of which there must be some) could set up a heat engine to run a refrigerator to cool off a portion of their surroundings to any desired temperature."

rossloeb
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Great Engineering Quotes
rossloeb   2/4/2014 4:59:32 PM
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My favorite quote (though I don't know who said it first) --

The Optimist sees the glass half full; The Pessimist sees the glass half empty; The Engineer sees a glass that's twice as big as it needs to be.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Lots of wisdom
Elizabeth M   2/4/2014 4:36:35 AM
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Yes, I agree, Chuck. Not a high percentage, but generally higher, and I think it is probably more common in other fields, too, where absolute focus on something is key. I wouldn't be surprised if some genius musicians, physicists, doctors and the like didn't also perhaps have the same inclination. It would be an interesting study!

Charles Murray
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Re: Lots of wisdom
Charles Murray   2/3/2014 6:04:14 PM
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I think there's something to it, Liz. I've known too many engineers over the years who seem to fit the mold you're talking about. It's not a high percentage of engineers, but I think the percentage is higher than what you'd see in law or journalism.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Lots of wisdom
Elizabeth M   2/3/2014 8:09:33 AM
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That sounds like a not-so-rare encounter with an engineer, Chuck! Social awkwardness or shyness often is a common trait of the typical engineering personality (no, not in all cases, of course). I think it's because that type of focus on problem-solving particularly in the scientifical or mathematical realm takes a lot of processing from one part of the brain, leaving other parts undeveloped.

In fact, it's not unsuprising there is a link between Asberger's Syndrome and engineers. In fact, there was a journalism article once exploring the incidence of Asberger's in Silicon Valley and the high potential for engineers who meet at work and marry to have autistic children or children with the syndrome. It was controversial, but there is also medical backing to these claims.

The thing is, people with Asberger's may have difficulty forming social or emotional bonds but then it means they really excel at something in particular--engineering, for instance. There also is a very talented surfer named Clay Marzo who famously has Asbergers and does a lot of volunteer work with people with this disease and autism. It's his syndrome that makes him such a talented athlete--he has that single-minded focus. So these parallels are quite interesting to look at.

Elizabeth M
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Re: Pi
Elizabeth M   2/3/2014 7:21:16 AM
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Sorry, Pubudu, I am not sure what you mean. Are you talking about the tendency for engineers to wear polo shirts and jeans?

a.saji
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Re: Lots of wisdom
a.saji   1/31/2014 9:25:53 PM
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@taimoor: I don't think providing an explanation is bad but you have to make sure its not repeated and act based on the explanation in the future 

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